Clock Movements

A clock movement is considered the inner workings of a clock or time piece.This is the main engine that runs the clock and keeps time going. Clock movements have two main categories- battery and mechanical.

A battery operated movement, sometimes referred to as a quartz or quartex clock movement keeps time with electricity from batteries. These are generally cheap to replace and hard to fix. Clockworks offers some of the highest quality replacement battery movements for your projects here.

Mechanical clock movements are more complex and scientific. Mechanical movements run off weights, cables, gravity and springs. Identifying your mechanical clock movement is the first step in replacing or repairing your clock. You can get help identifying your movement here

About Mechanical Clock Hands Tabs

Mechanical Clock HandsHand RemovalHand InstallationOrdering Mechanical HandsChime On Time Fix

Please view these information tabs to help with getting the Mechanical Clock Hands.

Removing Mechanical Clock Hands

Removing Mechanical Clock Hands is fast and easy to do. The following are instructions for German mechanical movements post WW2 hand removal.

German Post WW2 wall, mantle and floor models

Turn the hand nut to the left while holding the minute hand with your fingers. Some small needle nose pliers may be needed to loosen the nut first. Once the nut is loose, you can turn it with your fingers until it comes off. The minute hand will be able to wiggle straight off its square arbor and off of the clock. The hour hand is a friction fit, so just twist the hour hand back and forth and pull toward you until it comes off. If you have a second hand bit, that is only a friction also, so just grab it with your fingernails and pull toward you.

American Antique time and strike

These type of movements come in two styles. if there is a minute hand nut, the first style is the same as above. Be very careful not to lose this hand nut. They are very hard to find and replace. The second style will have a pin holding the minute hand on instead of a nut. This pin is tapered, meaning it's fat on one side and skinny on the other usually. Just grab the fat side with needle nose pliers and yank the pin out. The minute hand will fall out with a washer. Save the washer and the pin for ease of reinstalling the hands.

- - The content of this web page and web site was written and copyright by James Stoudenmire of Clockworks.com - It may not be used commercially without permission. - -

German Mechanical Clock Hand Installation

The installation of the clock hands on a German mechanical movement is reverse of removal. If either the movement was replaced, or the hands are new, the minute hand must be adjusted. This is so it will point to the correct time when it chimes.

Installing the hour hand

First comes the hour hand as a friction fit. Put the hand on its round post and twist and push toward the front front of the dial. Be sure it is not in contact with the dial at any point of its travel in the circle. This includes the base of the hour hand, it cannot rub against the hole in the clock face itself. As its only a friction fit, it can be turned to point to whatever hour it is, just with your fingers.

Installing the minute hand

The minute hand installation is done by putting the square hole in the hand, on the square post of the hand shaft. The bottom of the minute hand cannot be rubbing the hour hand tube or the hour hand. If it is, the hour hand has to be set lower on its tube. With the minute hand on its square post now its time to put the nut on. The nut goes on finger tight and then a little bit more with needle nose pliers to make it secure.

Mechanical Clock Chime On Time

These are the directions to get a German mechanical clock to chime on time. This means having the clock hands point to the right spot when the clock chimes. When replacing a clock movement, or getting new hands, either one, you will notice it will chime 5 minutes before it is supposed to, or 10 min after, something like this. This page explains how to correct this situation. It is unbelievably fast and easy to do.

Working with the minute hand

After a new mechanical movement is installed, or if you are just installing a new set of hands, you will notice the clock will not chime at the time it's supposed to. To correct this, take the minute hand off of the clock. This is the longer of the two hands. With this minute hand off of the clock, turn it upside down and you will see it has a square hole where it attaches to the clock. This square hole is in a bushing that will rotate WITHIN the minute hand itself.

The correction

So, all you have to do is just use needle nose pliers to turn this bushing ever so slightly. Put the hand back on the clock and see if it’s pointing to the correct place where it chimed. If it is, then you are all set. If it is still not right, take the hand off and try again. Once you get the minute hand to point where it just chimed you then set to the correct time.

The conclusion

It is really that easy. You do not have to mess with the clock at all, only the hand itself. In other words, to put it in a silly way, take the minute hand off of the clock and walk to the garage with it. Take it far, far away from the clock. When in your garage take needle nose pliers and turn the bushing within the hand itself. Then walk back to the clock and put it on. See if it's now pointing to the right spot. Sounds silly but you get the idea!

- - The content of this web page and web site was written and copyright by James Stoudenmire of Clockworks.com - It may not be used commercially without permission. - -

Mechanical Clock Hands

The German mechanical clock hands are sold by the time track diameter. When ordering these mechanical clock hands, you will need this measurement. The dial diameter is the measurement of the time track, and this means from just outside the 9 to just outside the 3. For example, if this explained time track diameter is 6 inches, you would order hands for a 6 inch time track in the option list. When you get the hands for a 6 inch time track you will have a minute hand about 2 7/8 long from the mounting hole to the end. The proportionally smaller hour hand will come with the minute hand. This is a vastly different way of measuring than the quartz clock hands.

Ordering Hands

After getting the time track diameter measurement as explained, its time to choose a style of hand. On the style you choose, drop down the option menu and see if your measurement is listed. Remember, the minute hand will come a little less than half of this time track measurement.

How they are sent

Comes as a pair, hour and minute hand both. Ships the next business day from Clockworks.com in Huntington MA USA, via the method you chose upon checkout.

- - The content of this web page and web site was written and copyright by James Stoudenmire of Clockworks.com - It may not be used commercially without permission. - -

Mechanical Clock Chime On Time

These are the directions to get a German mechanical clock to chime on time. This means having the clock hands point to the right spot when the clock chimes. When replacing a clock movement, or getting new hands, either one, you will notice it will chime 5 minutes before it is supposed to, or 10 min after, something like this. This page explains how to correct this situation. It is unbelievably fast and easy to do.

Working with the minute hand

After a new mechanical movement is installed, or if you are just installing a new set of hands, you will notice the clock will not chime at the time it's supposed to. To correct this, take the minute hand off of the clock. This is the longer of the two hands. With this minute hand off of the clock, turn it upside down and you will see it has a square hole where it attaches to the clock. This square hole is in a bushing that will rotate WITHIN the minute hand itself.

The correction

So, all you have to do is just use needle nose pliers to turn this bushing ever so slightly. Put the hand back on the clock and see if it’s pointing to the correct place where it chimed. If it is, then you are all set. If it is still not right, take the hand off and try again. Once you get the minute hand to point where it just chimed you then set to the correct time.

The conclusion

It is really that easy. You do not have to mess with the clock at all, only the hand itself. In other words, to put it in a silly way, take the minute hand off of the clock and walk to the garage with it. Take it far, far away from the clock. When in your garage take needle nose pliers and turn the bushing within the hand itself. Then walk back to the clock and put it on. See if it's now pointing to the right spot. Sounds silly but you get the idea!

- - The content of this web page and web site was written and copyright by James Stoudenmire of Clockworks.com - It may not be used commercially without permission. - -

Clock Hand Measurement

Jauch Tabs

Jauch Clock MovementsJauch conversion informationMoon dial compatibilityJauch availabilityWhy replace it

Please view these information tabs to learn more about replacing the Jauch Clock Movements.

Jauch clock movement conversion

Jauch clock movement conversion is the best thing to do if it is possible. The new unit from Clockworks.com would be a fraction of the cost of a cleaning on the old. There is no way even the best repair job can be better than a new one. Although the conversion will provide a movement produced by someone else, the quality is equivalent. The following is a guide for the Jauch clock movement conversion aspect alone. These are the specific requirements for the conversion only. The regular movement installation instructions will be provided upon checkout separate from this.

Three weight movement conversions only

These are available only for the three weight floor clock models such as on a grandfather clock. If you have spring driven Jauch clock movement there is no replacement and an overhaul of the movement is the only option. If this is your current situation please email some pics of the clock movement to [email protected] and we can quote you for a professional restoration instead.

Movement includes the following

The Hermle conversion kit is equipped with the movement, shims, seat board screws, hands, and pendulum hook. The movement itself comes with the chains with the hooks and ends. It also comes with the leader in the back with its suspension spring. It will have the nut to hold the hands on the clock on the front side. The movement will already be oiled and tested. It is ready to be mounted and set up to run for another 30 years.

Tools required

The Jauch to Hermle conversion requires only the very basic tools. Two pairs of needle nose pliers and a couple different screw drivers is usually all that is required.

The simple conversion only stuff

Instructions for the movement will be emailed to you however these are for the conversion only. The conversion does require a little more involvement than just swapping out the same with same. The movement is not the same but it is so close we only need to do a couple of things. Therefore these are the simple requirements specific to the conversion Jauch to Hermle.

These are the only things that make this a little more involved than just swapping the movement with the exact same. The dial has to be attached to the case instead of the movement. The new movement will have to sit on the shims to have the hand shaft the correct height. It requires a little more weight for the chime and will come with the filler to put into the current weight shell. The movement will come with different hands because your old ones will not fit. Kit comes with a new top hook for the wood stick pendulum because the old one will not hang on the new movement. All this comes with the kit and is all just swapping the parts except the dial.

Shims are included

The hand shaft height on the new movement is a little different then the old. It us up higher and would require these shims to boost it up in the air some. That way its in line with the dial hole like it was.

Hands are included

The old hands will no longer fit on the new movement so it is included with this conversion kit. They will be the same in style and appearance as the clock has now. Its only the mounting hole for the minute hand is a different size.

Pendulum top hook included

All these Jauch kits had wood stick pendulums on them instead of the brass lyre style. The way in which the pendulum attaches to its hanger is with a top hook. Its just the little hook on the top. A new one comes with the kit because the old one will no longer hang up there.

Longer seat board screws

Because we raised this movement up some for the hand shaft to line up with the dial hole, longer screws are needed. These are the two screws that go under the movement to secure it. They are longer to reach up in there to secure the new movement.

All that was easy - just swapping a couple parts.

Lets now explain the details on the clock dial alterations that maybe required.

The moon dial

The dial would need to be attached to the wooden clock case instead of mounted to the movement. If the current dial has feet that lock into the movement right now, this will have to change. The feet would be removed and the dial attached to the wood instead. The moon phase will no longer function. Its this or just get a new dial for your new clock movement if it is available. More details about the dial in another section.

- - The content of this web page and web site was written and copyright by James Stoudenmire of Clockworks.com - It may not be used commercially without permission. - -

Jauch Clock Conversion Dial Instructions

These are the instructions for the dial to be mounted to the wood case instead of the movement on a Jauch clock conversion. If attached to the movement with four posts coming off the back of the dial, this will have to change.

Clock moon dial mounting

There are two ways the dial is mounted on the clock. The best scenario for the conversion is to have the dial attached to the wooden case. It will have no interaction with the movement at all except if there is a moon phase. With the dial attached to the wood case already it makes this easy. The dial is taken care of and there is nothing required to do with it. The other half of the time the dial maybe mounted to the movement via four posts on the back.

Dial feet removal if needed

With the four post instance these posts would need to be removed and some small holes drilled into the corners of the dial. The dial would need to be attached to the wood case instead of the movement. The reason is the new movement will not have the holes in the front plate to clip the dial on the movement. Some posts unscrew and some snap off but in some situations you may have to use the bolt cutters.

Dial back board removal option

A different way is to remove that back blind plate that the face is attached to for the Jauch clock movement conversion. That is the plate the bolts stick out of and is separate from the fancy front face. They are screwed in or riveted just see how its mounted and reverse that method. The risk on doing it this way is bending or scratching the face when doing this. Also if screws are rivets are removed it could leave holes in the front face appearance.

The dial makes the clock

The dial on the old Jauch movement may be better quality than what is on the market today. If it is a high end clock from back in the day, the dial maybe worth treating well. The dial is what is looked at all the time, it makes the clock so to speak. So treat the dial well and try not to scratch it up during the conversion. If all goes south we do offer them for the movement kit to replace what is currently used.

Handling the dial

When handling shiny parts like the weights and the dial use gloves to avoid touching the shiny part with the skin. These are not delicate but if the corners get hit they curl up and does not look good upon correction. So just do not let it hit the ground and to not touch the shiny parts with the skin.

Dial's moon phase interaction

In either situation the moon phase will no longer function if using the dial that is currently on the clock. If insistent on the phase of the moon turning it is required to get a new dial for your new movement. Clockworks.com offers these on the moon dial page will usually have a dial for the new unit. A moon gear to spin the new moon dial because your old moon gear will not fit would be needed. There is only a handful of customers that are very insistent they have the moon disk spin and usually no one looks at it anyway.

- - The content of this web page and web site was written and copyright by James Stoudenmire of Clockworks.com - It may not be used commercially without permission. - -

Jauch Mechanical Clock Movement Availability

Jauch mechanical clock movement availability is zero. They are out of business and nothing is made. However there is still hope for a replacement unit but only if it is a three weight driven movement.

Jauch three weight clocks

Available for conversion from Jauch to a Hermle movement instead. This is what clockworks.com is offering as a replacement. The Hermle clock movements are of equivalent quality and size and have the same functions. The Hermle clock movement gets shipped with a few added items to make the conversion possible and simple.

Conversion requirements, the short version

The dial has to be attached to the wood case instead of the movement itself this is not hard and is explained. The top hook of your wood stick pendulum would be swapped out (provided). New hands are needed with your new movement (provided). Simple things like this will make the conversion possible and easy to do.

Jauch spring driven clocks

No longer made and there is no conversion kit either. These would need to be overhauled by us by sending it in. These ship ok and never a problem when they are double boxed. Clockworks.com would need only the movement alone and nothing else. The only replacement method that could be done is basically gut the clock case and start over.

Why the spring Jauch cant have a conversion kit

There is no close equivalent movement to this obsolete Jauch movement style in the modern market. What is the closest is still so far from plug and play its not worth chasing. It would require a new dial because the winding holes will no longer line up. The pendulum will not fit up to the new so that also gets swapped. The hands are not the same as the new one, the overall dimensions are not the same. The shaft the hands go on would be a different length. The strike or chime hammers will not be in the same place on the new one. So really there is no new one that will convert into the Jauch spring driven clock case. It would be more like just building a new clock from an old clock case.

- - The content of this web page and web site was written and copyright by James Stoudenmire of Clockworks.com - It may not be used commercially without permission. - -

Why a New Jauch Clock Movement

Why get a new Jauch clock movement conversion instead of repairing the old one? The old movement has worked 30 to 40 years with not much complaint. However over time the oil becomes a solid and creates wear on the outer plates. The clock can be cleaned with new bushings installed in these outer plates. But this is time consuming and expensive both so it would end up taking weeks or months to complete. The price would be twice as much as a new movement would cost as well. Even the best repair of the old unit will not be better than the new unit, that would be impossible. So the choice is easy, if the movement is converted to the new one it will cost less and be done fast.

How the new movement comes

Jauch is out of business but clockworks.com offers one by Hermle that is very close to the same. The quality is the same and still made in Germany. The new one will be the same in every way except a few fitting modifications are required. The movement will be brand new and ready to run another 30 years and will come already oiled with instructions. The movement will come with its chains and the hand nut in the front. It will also come with its pendulum leader and the suspension spring at the top. Basically that entire gear meatball that came out of the clock case by removing the two screws from underneath.

Advantages of the new one

The new movement is much easier to get parts for because there is no parts available for Jauch. Because it will now be made by Hermle instead of Jauch there are more options also. You can upgrade the pendulum to a metal Lyre style if you choose where this is not possible for the Jauch unit. The movement can be replaced again in another 25-30 years as the converted movements are still available. If anything were to ever happen to the dial, hands, gong, weights or pendulum, then you can get all this new. It costs less than a repair especially considering a repair would have to be done every 8 years or so. A new movement is less than an overhaul, it will last longer, and is faster and easier.

- - The content of this web page and web site was written and copyright by James Stoudenmire of Clockworks.com - It may not be used commercially without permission. - -

Kieninger tabs

Kieninger Clock MovementKieninger IdentificationOrdering the clock movementWhy get a new Kieninger?

Please view these information tabs to learn more about replacing a Kieninger Clock Movement.

Kieninger clock movement identification

The first step to replace the movement or any components is to first do the identification process on the Kieninger clock movement. To get the new clock movement price and what it includes, we start with the numbers. The numbers are also required to get components of the clock also. Components include pendulums, dials, hands, keys, cranks, chime blocks, mounting screws, weights, pulleys or chains.

Decoding Kieninger clock movements

For example lets say the movement numbers are 81 K 116cm.

  • 1981 =The first numbers 81 is the year made if it is an on older unit. On the new units this number is not the year but only an internal engineering code.
  • K = The K is the movements series. This is the basic raw movement plate size and internal gear configuration.
  • 116CM = The pendulum length in centimeters measured from the top of the movement all the down. Based on the smallest 4 1/2 inch bob diameter.

Kieninger Clock Movement Identification

Dating the Kieninger movement

Above is stated 81 was the date, however this has changed in the later years. After a certain date that first number is no longer the date produced. So it may or may not be the date, but you can just ignore that first number when replacing the unit. There is no longer a solid way to date the Kieninger clock movement unless it is stamped on the plate.

We can help

The new movement will fit into the clock case just as the old one did. Keep using the same components such as the dial, pendulum, chime block and weights. If it is a weight driven clock it will come with the chains or cables with pulleys. If this decoding process is confusing, just email the numbers or a picture to [email protected] Kieninger clock movement questions and ordering can be done by phone also 800-381-7458.

- - The content of this web page and web site was written and copyright by James Stoudenmire of Clockworks.com - It may not be used commercially without permission. - -

Kieninger Clock Movement Ordering

Kieninger Clock Movement Ordering starts with the numbers off of the back plate of the clockworks. The numbers help us figure out the correct unit by plate size. After we get the plate size we narrow it down by attributes such as triple chime. In other works all the units that have the letter K on the back will have the same plate size. After we determine we have a K series we select things like triple chime or Westminster only. If there is any uncommon things added after that we select it. Such as sequential or carousal or other special qualities added such as this.

Steps to a new Kieninger clock movement

First go to the letter that is stamped on the movement only. If for example the movement number is 81 K 116cm ignore all but the K at first. Find the K series on the Kieninger movement page at Clockworks.com. Then we can continue with matching up the CM in the drop down list.

Attribute selection

On that same drop down list with the CM listed there are some other options usually. The options to select are the specific quality's the movement may or may not have on the movement. Such things as Westminster only or triple chime. If there is dancers on the movement it may say carousel. Just pick the what ever movement you have that matches the options.

After ordering the Kieninger movement

After ordering the new Kieninger clock movement a receipt will be emailed. The installation instructions will be provided via a link on the receipt. Weight driven units ships with the chains or cables with pulleys included. The new movement will ship the next business day by Fed Ex ground.

- - The content of this web page and web site was written and copyright by James Stoudenmire of Clockworks.com - It may not be used commercially without permission. - -

New Clock Movement Benefits

New clock movement benefits far outweigh the benefits of an overhaul. This section will explain why that is and what the best course of action is to get your clock working.

Getting the movement worked on

Clocks need to be oiled after 10 years or so. Then, after 20 or 30 years, a full break down of the movement is necessary. This is all well and good and can be done with the old movement. The movement will run for another 5 or 15 years with no issues but then it will be time to do it again.

Every time the movement is worked on and re-bushed, it will last less and less time before it needs attention again. The repair process is expensive because it takes time to separate the plates, remove all the gears, do the necessary work, and then put them all back together again. This process may need to be redone if not perfect the first time. The turn around time to complete an overhaul could be anywhere from 1 to 3 months, and in some extreme cases, a year. It is a slow moving venture that costs twice as much as a new movement would. If a new movement is not available, then this is the best, and only, way to handle a clock repair.

Replacing with a new clock movement

If the movement is still in production, it is far better to just get the new one. Mass production makes the movement so affordable it will cost a fraction of the price of the repair work. The movement will be the same one but brand new and ready to run 30 years without much complaint. There is absolutely no way to repair an old movement so that it is better than new. Even the best clockmaker using the best equipment cannot make the movement better than a new one.

A new one is a factory fresh restart. The clock will be like it was originally when it was purchased from the store. The new movement will be made by the same people, with the same machines, and the movement is the same. It is not a close replica or made somewhere else besides Germany. It is the same movement. Not a knock off or replica. So wouldn't it make sense to get the new one instead of chasing the old? The choice is clear and obvious. The new movement will cost a fraction of the price and the clock is up and running in no time.

Movements to consider getting repaired instead

If a unit is no longer in production and not available new, then a repair is most likely your only option. However we will try to convert it to a new unit that is close and easy to adapt. If it is not an easy one to adapt, or would take too much case work, then the best solution is to get it worked on.

Another movement to consider getting overhauled instead of replaced is the tubular bell, which is a high end movement. The price of a tubular bell unit makes an overhaul more attractive. This is because of the high price on the new ones which is currently around $1600. Usually the price is less for the new unit but instead these units are more costly than the overhaul by clockworks.com anyway. We can charge only $900 for the complete overhaul on these units. Ultimately the choice is yours. There is a good argument in both directions that makes sense on these expensive units.

Clockworks.com = The best repair service

We would love to do the overhaul here at clockworks.com and we do the best job. There are two ways to fix clocks; the easy way and the hard way. We only do it the hard way with no short cuts. It is even more important for us to do your repair than another company because we do not go to your house. There is no one being intrusive in your home and possibly damaging your clock case.

The movement itself is the only item that gets sent to us. No components need to be sent since we have everything else here such as weights, dials and pendulums. It is a great advantage to have clockworks.com work on your movement for this fact alone. A clock supply depot such as us does not need to wait for parts. We possess everything we could possibly need to complete a thorough, professional clock repair right here.

The new movement

New clock movement benefits usually do indeed outweigh the repair option. The movement will already come lubricated with clock oil so there is no need to oil it. The clock comes with cables and pulleys, or chains, the leader, and suspension spring. This is everything that comes out when you remove the two screws that are under the movement, besides the dial and weights.

Once you get the hands and the clock dial out of the way (instructions included) it's only a matter of removing the two screws from underneath. The new movement can be swapped out by an experienced person in 10 or 15 minutes. An inexperienced person will take longer, but the point is that it isn't hard to do. There are some instances where a clock case was made in an annoying way that makes it more difficult, but for mass produced clocks this is not the situation. This more related to a few individual clockmakers who may have designed the case to make it more tricky to get the movement in or out.

Summary

A new clock movement is typically less than half the cost of an overhaul. It will also be on its way to the customer instantly instead of months later. A new clock movement will last the longest of any other choice.

- - The content of this web page and web site was written and copyright by James Stoudenmire of Clockworks.com - It may not be used commercially without permission. - -

Jauch Clock Dial Conversion

Jauch Clock Conversion Dial Instructions

These are the instructions for the dial to be mounted to the wood case instead of the movement on a Jauch clock conversion. If attached to the movement with four posts coming off the back of the dial, this will have to change.

Clock moon dial mounting

There are two ways the dial is mounted on the clock. The best scenario for the conversion is to have the dial attached to the wooden case. It will have no interaction with the movement at all except if there is a moon phase. With the dial attached to the wood case already it makes this easy. The dial is taken care of and there is nothing required to do with it. The other half of the time the dial maybe mounted to the movement via four posts on the back.

Dial feet removal if needed

With the four post instance these posts would need to be removed and some small holes drilled into the corners of the dial. The dial would need to be attached to the wood case instead of the movement. The reason is the new movement will not have the holes in the front plate to clip the dial on the movement. Some posts unscrew and some snap off but in some situations you may have to use the bolt cutters.

Dial back board removal option

A different way is to remove that back blind plate that the face is attached to for the Jauch clock movement conversion. That is the plate the bolts stick out of and is separate from the fancy front face. They are screwed in or riveted just see how its mounted and reverse that method. The risk on doing it this way is bending or scratching the face when doing this. Also if screws are rivets are removed it could leave holes in the front face appearance.

The dial makes the clock

The dial on the old Jauch movement may be better quality than what is on the market today. If it is a high end clock from back in the day, the dial maybe worth treating well. The dial is what is looked at all the time, it makes the clock so to speak. So treat the dial well and try not to scratch it up during the conversion. If all goes south we do offer them for the movement kit to replace what is currently used.

Handling the dial

When handling shiny parts like the weights and the dial use gloves to avoid touching the shiny part with the skin. These are not delicate but if the corners get hit they curl up and does not look good upon correction. So just do not let it hit the ground and to not touch the shiny parts with the skin.

Dial's moon phase interaction

In either situation the moon phase will no longer function if using the dial that is currently on the clock. If insistent on the phase of the moon turning it is required to get a new dial for your new movement. Clockworks.com offers these on the moon dial page will usually have a dial for the new unit. A moon gear to spin the new moon dial because your old moon gear will not fit would be needed. There is only a handful of customers that are very insistent they have the moon disk spin and usually no one looks at it anyway.

- - The content of this web page and web site was written and copyright by James Stoudenmire of Clockworks.com - It may not be used commercially without permission. - -

About Urgos Clocks Main Tabs

Urgos Clock MovementWhy get a new Urgos?Not on the list?Urgos UW 7/** IssueUrgos UW 6/** issue

Please view these information tabs to learn more about Urgos clock movement availability

New Clock Movement Benefits

New clock movement benefits far outweigh the benefits of an overhaul. This section will explain why that is and what the best course of action is to get your clock working.

Getting the movement worked on

Clocks need to be oiled after 10 years or so. Then, after 20 or 30 years, a full break down of the movement is necessary. This is all well and good and can be done with the old movement. The movement will run for another 5 or 15 years with no issues but then it will be time to do it again.

Every time the movement is worked on and re-bushed, it will last less and less time before it needs attention again. The repair process is expensive because it takes time to separate the plates, remove all the gears, do the necessary work, and then put them all back together again. This process may need to be redone if not perfect the first time. The turn around time to complete an overhaul could be anywhere from 1 to 3 months, and in some extreme cases, a year. It is a slow moving venture that costs twice as much as a new movement would. If a new movement is not available, then this is the best, and only, way to handle a clock repair.

Replacing with a new clock movement

If the movement is still in production, it is far better to just get the new one. Mass production makes the movement so affordable it will cost a fraction of the price of the repair work. The movement will be the same one but brand new and ready to run 30 years without much complaint. There is absolutely no way to repair an old movement so that it is better than new. Even the best clockmaker using the best equipment cannot make the movement better than a new one.

A new one is a factory fresh restart. The clock will be like it was originally when it was purchased from the store. The new movement will be made by the same people, with the same machines, and the movement is the same. It is not a close replica or made somewhere else besides Germany. It is the same movement. Not a knock off or replica. So wouldn't it make sense to get the new one instead of chasing the old? The choice is clear and obvious. The new movement will cost a fraction of the price and the clock is up and running in no time.

Movements to consider getting repaired instead

If a unit is no longer in production and not available new, then a repair is most likely your only option. However we will try to convert it to a new unit that is close and easy to adapt. If it is not an easy one to adapt, or would take too much case work, then the best solution is to get it worked on.

Another movement to consider getting overhauled instead of replaced is the tubular bell, which is a high end movement. The price of a tubular bell unit makes an overhaul more attractive. This is because of the high price on the new ones which is currently around $1600. Usually the price is less for the new unit but instead these units are more costly than the overhaul by clockworks.com anyway. We can charge only $900 for the complete overhaul on these units. Ultimately the choice is yours. There is a good argument in both directions that makes sense on these expensive units.

Clockworks.com = The best repair service

We would love to do the overhaul here at clockworks.com and we do the best job. There are two ways to fix clocks; the easy way and the hard way. We only do it the hard way with no short cuts. It is even more important for us to do your repair than another company because we do not go to your house. There is no one being intrusive in your home and possibly damaging your clock case.

The movement itself is the only item that gets sent to us. No components need to be sent since we have everything else here such as weights, dials and pendulums. It is a great advantage to have clockworks.com work on your movement for this fact alone. A clock supply depot such as us does not need to wait for parts. We possess everything we could possibly need to complete a thorough, professional clock repair right here.

The new movement

New clock movement benefits usually do indeed outweigh the repair option. The movement will already come lubricated with clock oil so there is no need to oil it. The clock comes with cables and pulleys, or chains, the leader, and suspension spring. This is everything that comes out when you remove the two screws that are under the movement, besides the dial and weights.

Once you get the hands and the clock dial out of the way (instructions included) it's only a matter of removing the two screws from underneath. The new movement can be swapped out by an experienced person in 10 or 15 minutes. An inexperienced person will take longer, but the point is that it isn't hard to do. There are some instances where a clock case was made in an annoying way that makes it more difficult, but for mass produced clocks this is not the situation. This more related to a few individual clockmakers who may have designed the case to make it more tricky to get the movement in or out.

Summary

A new clock movement is typically less than half the cost of an overhaul. It will also be on its way to the customer instantly instead of months later. A new clock movement will last the longest of any other choice.

- - The content of this web page and web site was written and copyright by James Stoudenmire of Clockworks.com - It may not be used commercially without permission. - -

The Unlisted Urgos Clock Movement

Only the three weight clock movements are being produced in current times. Not every one of them either because some are now discontinued. Assuming we are working with a three weight movement in this section and not a two weight unit or spring driven. The two weight units are covered in another section and we call them the UW7/ series. Same with the spring driven UW6/ series these are no longer made but we have a section covering what can be done with Hermle instead.

Urgos movement number explanation

Upon every production run the movement number changes. The factory will produce the movement for years and then take a break on that series. When they start cranking them out again they call it a different name. So an old movement with a certain name may have the same movement available new but called something different. What used to be called a 03086 is now called a 03096 and so forth. This could be done a few times over in the time span of 40 or 50 years. So what is often required is converting the old number to the new number. However not all numbers are on the list or listed for sale. This does not mean we do not have it to offer, it only means we would need to figure out what one it is in modern times.

Urgos movement numbers simplified

The movement numbers usually start with a UW before the number. This UW can be ignored for replacing the movement or converting the number. UW only means it is made by the Urgos clock company. The letters after the number can be ignored also, such as in the movement number UW32/1A. The A can be ignored along with the UW as discussed, so we are only looking at 32/1 only. The three weight floor clock series only have the numbers starting with either 32 or 03 or 66. Example of starting with a 32 would be 32/1 and a 03 such as the 03101, the 66 as in 66020. If the movement starts with a 32 it is a square unit and if it starts with 03 or 66 it is a larger rectangle on instead.

Urgos movement number unlisted

If your movement numbers match with the numbers we list just find the number and click it. The link will bring up the new movement to view and order the product. If your movement number is not on the above list we need to figure out what the new number is and if its still made. What the numbers used to be may not be the same on the new units. Although the numbers may not match it will still be the same clock movement.

Urgos clock number conversions

Convert your three weight Urgos clock movement to the new number please use the below chart. This will match what the movement used to be called to what it is now called. With the new number it can then be found on the list of offered movements by Clockworks.com. Sometimes with three production runs it is required to convert the number twice. For example maybe the clock says UW32/1A you would drop the UW and the A at the end and just look at 32/1 only. The 32/1 is replaced with 32001 in one conversion and then there is still one more. On another production run they changed the number for this again and now it is called a 32319. So in the end the 32/1 and the 32001 and the 32319 are all the same unit with different names for the various production runs.

Urgos numbers with the / slash

If you have a / in the number, it’s definitely the old system and therefore an older movement which has lived its life as its over 40 years old. If it does not have a / it still may be the old numbering system as well. Either way, convert old number to the new and order the new unit. If the old numbers have a / in it, replace that / with one or sometimes two zeros. Just think of the / as zeros in other words. EXAMPLE: 32/1 is the same as 32001 and is the same as the converted number 32319. For assistance if needed please contact Clockworks.com 800-381-7458 if you get VM it only means the phones are jammed up and we will call you right back. Our email address is [email protected] if you choose to do that instead.

- - The content of this web page and web site was written and copyright by James Stoudenmire of Clockworks.com - It may not be used commercially without permission. - -

Urgos UW7/ series clock movement

Urgos UW7/ series clock movement is a two weight small floor clock movement. These units were very popular in the 1960s and 1970's. That alone puts it over the life expectancy of being a 25 year movement by far and needs to be replaced. If the movement is giving issues on top of this fact it is definitely time to either overhaul the old or get a new one if possible.

Repair or replace the Urgos UW7/ series?

The choice is obvious to get the new one for cost savings and life expectancy if possible and easy. Even when the movement is not made it is best to use a conversion to a different maker instead of having the repair work done. This is only if it makes sense to do so and with this particular series it does. The two weight Hermle units are so close and there is not much involved with the conversion aspect on these.

The Hermle clock movement alternative

Urgos UW7/ series clock movement is no longer made and not available by Clockworks.com. However these can often be converted to an equivalent quality new German clock movement. The movement numbers off of the old unit can be emailed to us at [email protected] with a picture from the back side.

Measurements needed from the customer

It would help if you provide the length of the pendulum from tip to tip when its off of the clock. Also the length of the hands shaft from the front plate of the movement itself and all the way out to the end of the minute hand nut threads. This last measurement requires the dial to come off for this to be measured. This measurement is from the front plate of the movement and all the way out. A movement plate is the two plates with all the gears in between. There is a front plate with its hand shaft sticking out and a back plate.

Urgos UW7/ Conversion requirements

Instructions for the new movement will be emailed to the customer upon checkout. However these are the specific things needed for the conversion aspect alone. These are the things that are in addition to what would be needed when going from same to same.

Chime block location

The chime block may have to be moved from one place to another. This is because the hammer location on the Hermle clock movement may not be in the same location. Such as the bim bam units made by Urgos sometimes had the hammer location on the back of the movement. The Hermle replacement would have the hammers on the side for the bim bam instead of the back. This is an example of the chime block needed to be moved from mounting in the back to being mounted on the side instead.

Urgos UW7/ Pendulum top swap

The top hook of the current clock pendulum will not hook up to the new movement the way it used to. The pendulum is fine however the top only would need to be changed for it to hook on to the new one. They do not cost much and of course is available at clockworks.com. The new top hook that is needed is available to purchase.

The rest of the clock movement parts fit fine

The current weights are fine for the new movement and so is the clock hands. There is nothing left to purchase besides the movement and the pendulum top hook. The new movement will comes with the chains and is already oiled.

- - The content of this web page and web site was written and copyright by James Stoudenmire of Clockworks.com - It may not be used commercially without permission. - -

Urgos UW6/ series clock movement

Urgos UW6/ series clock movement was mass produced in the 1950's through the 1970's. It was a popular unit for shelf clocks and wall clock applications because it was compact and ran a short pendulum. The spring driven Westminster movement runs for eight days on a single wind up. It chimes either Westminster only or three songs with triple chime.

Urgos UW6/ series is no longer made

These are no longer made but is still the best choice to go with a new clock movement if it is possible. Just having this movement alone puts the age 40 years old or more so it is time to replace even if it works fine. So if its giving issues on top of this fact it is just time to do something with it either way.

Hermle clock movement alternative

clockworks.com has a Hermle unit that is of equal quality to replace the Urgoes UW6/ series. The replacement movement would not be plug and play and there are some things required to act on. In the end if its able and willing to be done the clock will have a new movement of equal quality installed. The movement will run another 30 years with out much complaint and is not hard to put in. Instead of the typical same with same movement swap the extra steps required are listed below.

The Urgos conversion steps

The typical same with same movement swap instructions will be emailed upon purchase. These are the steps required for the conversion aspect alone. As it is going from an Urgos movement to a Hermle movement there are some additional concerns to address.

Clock dial incompatibility

The locations of the winding arbors on the Hermle movement are in slightly different than the Urgos UW6/ series. The holes in the clock dial face will not line up with this new movement to wind the clock. The customer could cover the old winding holes somehow and drill new ones to wind the clock. A sticky back metal or cardboard round disk does the trick or another creative idea. It only needs something to cover the old holes and drill new ones into that same disk.

Potential dial solution

Clockworks.com does have them to offer in gold and about 4 inches round with sticky backside. Even better than this is to get a new dial for your new movement if it is possible. There are so many dial shapes and sizes it is not a guarantee the same looking dial is available new. Please email Clockworks.com a picture of the old dial with some basic measurements. Clockworks.com will see if we have the same looking dial that can be drilled out with new holes to wind the clock.

Possible clock chime block work

Some applications of this conversion requires some handling of the chime block and rods. It is not common but sometimes it is needed to reverse the direction of the chime lock inside the clock case. The reason for this is because the new unit may or may not have the hammer heads on the opposite side. In order to avoid purchasing a new chime block the old one can be reversed in direction.

Working with the chime block

Not only would need need to reverse direction but also reverse the order of the rods within the block itself. The shortest rod would need to be where the longest rod was and continue down the line like this. As stated this is not so commonly needed. The reversal is only done to avoid the purchase of a new chime block and save cost. If a new one was purchased it would have the rods in the correct order and would only be required to put it in the new direction.

UW6/ Series Pendulum hook up

The pendulum may not hook up to the pendulum leader on the new clock movement. The leader is the part that the pendulum hangs onto on the back of the movement. The top hook of the pendulum may or may not fit the new movements leader. If becomes an issue clockworks.com offers an alternate top hook for your pendulum if its the wood stick style. If the clock takes a brass rod pendulum instead it maybe required to get a new pendulum with your new movement.

The rest is easy

The old key will fit the new movement the same as it did before. Clock hands are good to use with the new movement just as they did also. The pendulum length will be close enough to be able to regulate the time keeping.

- - The content of this web page and web site was written and copyright by James Stoudenmire of Clockworks.com - It may not be used commercially without permission. - -