Weights

Replacement weights for all types of clocks

Clock Kit Tabs

Mechanical Clock KitsTypes of clock kitsMovement optionsGet the kit before making the caseMaking the seat board

Please view these information tabs to help with determining the proper Mechanical Clock Kits for your clock case.

Mechanical Clock Kit Styles Available

Mechanical Clock Kit Styles Available include wall clocks, mantle (shelf) clocks, and floor clocks. Floor models includes the grand daughter, mother, and father series.

Chime types

All of the above, in the past, have been made with every chime type. In other words there are all these various ways to make noise, lets list them. There is the quarterly sounds that play a tune ever quarter hour, this are most common in the songs Westminster only, Or triple chime that includes Westminster St Micheal, or Wittington. As for the other noise makers, we call them strike clocks because they only strike out the hours and usually bong once on the half hour. These include Gong strike (coiled gong on the back or below the movement), Bell strike, or Bim Bam (sounds like its name, on two or three strike rods). Now that is not to say every one of these chime types are available for every type of clock kit in the world today, but those cover most of clocks ever produced in history.

Mechanical clock kits

Mechanical Clock Kit Styles are listed below, these are the names of the types of clocks you will see in the world. They are the clocks that you could potentially replicate in the modern world.

Wall / Mantle kits

Either weight driven or spring, but usually spring driven. The weight driven is less common because of all the weight that is hanging on the wall. Usually spring driven, with or without a pendulum. If there is no pendulum this means it has a balance wheel instead more like a watch.

Granddaughter / Grandmother clock kits

Granddaughters are usually spring driven with no weights. The grandmothers are usually chain driven with three weights for the chime units or two weights for any other strike styles. Its a shorter clock overall compared to the grandfather clocks.

Grandfather clock kits

Typically cable driven with three weights and triple chimes. This means the weights will hang on cables instead of chains, and plays your choice of three songs. Not always triple chime because some are Westminster only. This is the largest and tallest of the floor clocks.

- - The content of this web page and web site was written and copyright by James Stoudenmire of Clockworks.com - It may not be used commercially without permission. - -

Mechanical clock-kit movement options

Mechanical clock-kit movement options include many things. There are so many options that our predefined kits just cant include them all as it would overwhelm a potential customer. So if you would like any other option than what is listed in the predefined kits on the clock kits page, it is certainly possible, best to call to discuss. 800 381 7458


Floor Clocks

Chime type

Either Westminster only or triple chime. Both of these Mechanical Clock Kit options play a melody every 15 minutes and require a three weight movement. Also there is the bell strike option that will play on the top of the hour whatever hour it is, and once on the half hour.

Pendulum

Options are the length, the bob diameter, and if you would like a wood stick style The Pendulum or a fancy lyre style The Pendulum. The wood stick style is more antique look and the lyre is the contemporary style.

Hammer location

Either on the back for standard depth cases, or for the shallow depth we can do a side hammer unit.

Dial - is either a phase of the moon style, or just the hump top that says Tempus Fugit. Or we can zip off any moon The Dial or TF dial to provide a very nice square metal dial for you with no hump on the top at all. Another option is to use heavy paper stock on a thin board, use spray glue to make it stay.


Wall Clocks

Chime type

Either Westminster only, Triple chime, Bim Bam, gong or bell. Lots of chime options there, but whatever you would like to listen to out of these we can do usually.

Pendulum

Either the wood stick style or sometimes if its short enough, we can put a brass rod pendulum in. The Mechanical Clock Kit options brass rod pendulum is different than the fancy lyre pendulum as its just a brass rod going straight down with out all the decor.

Hammer Location

Includes the back, or on the side, or even the bottom on the wall clock kits.

Dial - Square dial made of paper stock that gets spray glued to a thin board, or a metal dial. In Arabic or Roman numerals. The dial on a wall clock would be mounted to the wood trim that goes around the dial, not interlocking with the movement. One style you cant get these days are the round dials that do lock into the movement, to have the appearance of the dial just floating in the air with the mounting hidden such as the Vienna regulator style.


Mantle or Shelf Clocks

Chime type

Is all of them really, you can have Westminster, triple chime, gong, bell, or Bim Bam strike for Mechanical clock movement kit options.

Pendulum

Options include metal rod to a decor for the kitchen style clocks are available, or a wood stick The Pendulum if the clock is tall enough. For the shorter mantle units it will be just a round bob that is usually adjustable for time keeping.

Dial

The hardest on the mantle units. To get a The Dial with bezel with glass in convex or flat is ideal, however not always possible. If the situation calls for this type of clock dial, you may want to chase a different clock design to make, it is not often it works out well unfortunately. The shelf clocks are easier as it has a door that closes with glass in the front, rather than the round brass bezel with dial and glass all in one combination.


This concludes the Mechanical Clock Kit options. Best to call and discuss the clock kits with us at 800 381 7458

- - The content of this web page and web site was written and copyright by James Stoudenmire of Clockworks.com - It may not be used commercially without permission. - -

Clock kit first - Build the case second

It is important to order the clock kit before building the clock case. If the case is built before getting the Mechanical Clock Kit it is possible the kit will not fit.

Why order first

It is possible to have a difficultly finding or adapting a clock movement kit to the current case built. The ideal dial size or other things would wanted but these items may not exist in the size needed for the case. Measurements that need to be correct for the clock kit to fit into the case. Order the Mechanical Clock Kit before building the case. With the kit set up on a stand while working on the case it can be measured. The various items on the kit such as the pendulum swing and dial size is known exactly.

What is not available

Clockworks.com offers a large variety of clock movements so this is the most easy thing to get. However when it comes to some components the resources can get slim on specific requests. Clock dials are the hardest part because there are so many shapes sizes and options. Such as round, square, hump top with no moon, hump with moon. Then you have all sorts of sizes, many of the antique clocks had clock dials that are in a size that is just not made on the market anymore. The grandfather clocks back in the day had over sized Clock dials with ships on them, cant get those anymore, as well as many other ones. Also you have to wind most clocks (unless they are chain driven) through the dial with a key. In other words the dial needs to be drilled out for the specific movement you ordered.

Summery

It is wise to get the Mechanical Clock Kit before building the clock case. Besides it will give an opportunity to set the movement kit up in your work shop to look at, get used too it, and measure for yourself what is needed.

- - The content of this web page and web site was written and copyright by James Stoudenmire of Clockworks.com - It may not be used commercially without permission. - -

Making a Seat Board

A seat board is the mount that the weight driven movement sits upon. The movement sits on this with the cables or chains hanging directly down between the boards.

Many of the modern clocks have this about 16 inches wide and is 2 and a half inches deep but this would vary on the clock case dimensions being worked on. In the center of the mounting board is a hole that is 1 inch wide going across the center of the 2 and a half inch deep seat board.

The hole is wide enough for the movement to sit on the board with its chains hanging down in the center. Then the screws with the rectangle washers seat board screws and washers can go up into the movement’s arbors on the bottom. Even easier would be just to mount two, three quarter or 1 inch square boards running parallel, which are 1 inch apart, across the inside of the clock case, this is really all a mounting board needs to consist of. The only thing that has to happen is the movement is in the air with the chains dangling down in between these boards. The boards just can’t be so wide that the pendulum rubs it on the back of the movement.

With the movement mounting in the air as described all that needs to be done is have the chimeblock mounted on the back of the clock case so the hammers can engage with them and make the chime sound. You will hang the weights and pendulum on the movement obvious places, and lock the dial into the movement from the front.

- - The content of this web page and web site was written and copyright by James Stoudenmire of Clockworks.com - It may not be used commercially without permission. - -

Chime Quartz Tabs

Chiming Pendulum Quartz Clock MovementsRemovalInstallationWhat To MeasureDial Thickness To Post SizeDefinitionsPendulum Hits Sides

Please view these information tabs - Chiming Pendulum Quartz Clock Movements can come with or without chimes, and with or with out a pendulum.

Quartz Clock Movement Removal

This note explains quartz clock movement removal from the case. The following does not apply to quartz units made in Germany and also clock inserts. It is required that there is already access to both the back side and the dial side of the clock. There is no many case designs it would not be possible to cover this information. The clock case went to together so it comes apart that is the logic. So in whatever way we need to be able to access both the front dial and the back of the movement to continue.

Getting access to the dial area

There are many case designs and styles and there is no telling what way you're clock case is. Most times this is a very easy thing to do but of course there are some instances they do not make it user friendly. It is on the customers end to get to the dial and movement area to continue with the swap out.

Clock hand removal

Quartz Clock Movement Removal always needs the hands removed first. This is so there is access to the hardware that mounts the unit.

Minute hand

In the vast production of quartz clock movements exists mainly two styles of minute hands. One has the nut holding it secure and the other style is only on by friction fit. The friction fit has no nut and just pulls off with twist and pull at once. The other style has the nut on the top of the minute hand to hold it down and this is the style we work with here at clockworks.com. Removal is done by holding the minute hand while turning the nut to the left with needle nose pliers. Now it can taken off the rest of the way with the fingers instead of using the pliers.

Hour hand

Next is the hour hand, this is only a friction fit with a round hole in the hand, the tube its on is tapered fatter as it goes down into the movement. Just twist the hand and pull it toward you until it comes off.

Second hand

If there is a second hand on the clock, it only needs to be grabbed with the thumb nails and pulled straight off of the clock to take it off.

- - The content of this web page and web site was written and copyright by James Stoudenmire of Clockworks.com - It may not be used commercially without permission. - -

Chime Quartz Movement Installation

The following is the basic installation for a chiming quartz movement from clockworks.com. There is more to do with whatever specific chime unit purchased however this will get it mounted. Each unit is varied with there chime functions and speaker style so it would be required to see individual instructions for this information.

Installation sequence

The sequence of installation of these fine quartz clock movements. The movements come with two different minute hand nuts. One is a cap nut if no second hand is used, the other one is a doughnut style and this is used if there is a second hand. The intent is to use one nut and toss out the other one that is not needed.

1. Hanger and rubber washer

Hanger goes on the new movement if it has this option and then the rubber washer. Both go over that fat post that sticks out the front of the movement.

2. Mount the movement

The movement goes through the back of the dial toward the front. Put the brass washer and hex nut on next to secure the movement to the back of the clock dial. A clock dial is the part with the hands and numbers on it and is also called a clock face.

3. Hour hand

The hour hand goes on as a friction fit just twist and push.

4. Minute hand

The minute hand has an oblong hole and this goes onto the oblong shaft at the end of the hand shaft. The minute hand goes on and its nut secures it.

5. Second hand

If there is a second hand this goes on just by a friction fit and this would be last. Just stick it in the hole at the end of the hand shaft as a friction fit.

6. The finish line

Point the hands to whatever time it is and your done chime quartz movement installation.

Chime Quartz Movement Installation

Quartz clock movement measuring

When the quartz clock movement is ordered it will ask for the post length. A hex nut will be on this threaded post that is to be measured. A hex nut is a 6 sided nut that secures the movement to the back of the clock dial. A clock dial is the thing with the numbers on it also called a clock face. The dial may or may not have a wood backing to it. With a wood backing the dial or face would be thicker and need a longer post. Clockworks.com offers multiple post lengths on the quartz movements for this reason. The post has to be long enough to go through whatever thickness we are calling the dial.

How to measure quartz clock movement post

What to measure

When replacing a quartz clock movement you will need to measure the post on the old unit. This is so you can match it up with your new quartz movement. The post is the part that goes through the dial (face) and mounts from the front. This applies all clockworks.com quartz movements including chiming quartz, time only quartz.

- - The content of this web page and web site was written and copyright by James Stoudenmire of Clockworks.com - It may not be used commercially without permission. - -

Measuring quartz post lengths

To replace a quartz clock movements we need to do some measuring to get the post length. The post has to stick out through the front of the clock dial. It has to stick out on the front side enough to put on the hex nut on. The movement would then be secured to the back of the dial (clock face) so it will stay and not move. So the movement will turn and the hands will point to the right place where it was set.

Use the chart if building a clock

The below chart will tell us what size post is required to be able to go through the thickness of the clock dial. Again, all that is needed is the post to be longer than the thickness of the clock dial. A clock dial is the face or you can say the thing with the numbers on it.

Measure if replacing a clock

If replacing a movement and not building clocks it maybe easier to just measure the old post instead. Remove the quartz clock movement first by removing the hands and then the hex nut. Next measure the threaded post that the hex nut was on only. Only measure the fat part of the hand shaft that we call a post, this is the part that takes the hex nut only. This is the part that secures the movement to the dial and is all that needs to be measured. The old unit fit before its the correct post length you will need for your brand new quartz clock movement. This applies to all quartz clock movements available on clockworks.com. Such as chiming quartz and time only quartz.

Dial Thickness

  • 1/16 inch thick
  • 3/16 inch thick
  • 5/16 inch thick
  • 9/16 inch thick
  • 3/4 inch thick

Size Post Needed

  • 3/16"
  • 5/16"
  • 7/16"
  • 11/16"
  • 15/16"
How to measure quartz clock movement post

- - The content of this web page and web site was written and copyright by James Stoudenmire of Clockworks.com - It may not be used commercially without permission. - -

Quartz clock movement glossary

The quartz clock movement glossary below are the terms typically used when replacing a unit. This will help us understand the instructions for building or replacing quartz clock movements.

Clock Dial Dial =

The clock dial is the thing with the numbers on it that you tell the time with. Sometimes called the clock face and can come in any size or shape as long as there is indicators as to what the time is.

Quartz clock dial Post =

Threaded portion on the movement that takes the hex nut. This is the fat part of the quartz clock movements hands shaft, and this part sticks through the back of the dial to the front to get mounted with a hex nut.

Quartz clock mounting hex nut Hex Nut =

A six sided nut that threads onto the movement post. This secures the movement to the back of the dial so it will stay there. The movements post sticks out just enough to get this hex nut on and so everything is secure and ready for the clock hands.

Quartz clock movement hanger Hanger =

A hanger is the steel part to hang clock up on the wall and comes with the time only series quartz clock movements. The hanger is included with the quartz clock movement, but optional to use.

Quartz clock hands Hands =

Quartz clock hands are measured by the minute hand only. They come as a set when ordered, the hour hand is smaller and shorter of course but we only measure the length of the minute hand from the center of the mount to the end. This applies to quartz clock movement hands only. (battery run)

Quartz clock movement second hand Second Hand =

The second hand is the skinny hand that goes very fast on the clock. There are two types of second hand motions, one will sweep around in a continuous fashion. These types of quartz clock movements are called a continuous sweep. If the movement jumps from one second to the next we call it a step motion instead. The second hands are mounted with a tube that is on the hand itself. This tube sticks friction fit into the end of the quartz clock movements hand shaft.

- - The content of this web page and web site was written and copyright by James Stoudenmire of Clockworks.com - It may not be used commercially without permission. - -

Quartz Pendulum Hits the Sides

Do you hear a bonk, bonk, bonk all day and night? This is because the pendulum bob keeps hitting the sides of the clock case with each swing. It may not stop the clock, the clock will work just fine. However the knocking sound of the pendulum hitting the sides of the clock case can be annoying. Lucky for us the correction is fairly simple on these pendulum quartz clock movements.

Why

A quartz pendulum hits the sides of the clock case happens when the magnet on the movement is too strong. Either the magnet is too strong or the bob on the pendulum is too wide. Both of these problems can be fixed easy.

The correction

The pendulum bob diameter can be swapped out for a smaller size. The alternative fix is to lessen the strength of the magnet on the back of the movement itself. I have heard of this being done with masking tape with good results. It just creates a slight barrier of the magnetic pull enough to reduce the overall swing of the pendulum. Either way, putting tape on the back or swapping out the bob, you will be left with a quiet clock again.

- - The content of this web page and web site was written and copyright by James Stoudenmire of Clockworks.com - It may not be used commercially without permission. - -

Chime Quartz Movement Installation

Chime Quartz Movement Installation

The following is the basic installation for a chiming quartz movement from clockworks.com. There is more to do with whatever specific chime unit purchased however this will get it mounted. Each unit is varied with there chime functions and speaker style so it would be required to see individual instructions for this information.

Installation sequence

The sequence of installation of these fine quartz clock movements. The movements come with two different minute hand nuts. One is a cap nut if no second hand is used, the other one is a doughnut style and this is used if there is a second hand. The intent is to use one nut and toss out the other one that is not needed.

1. Hanger and rubber washer

Hanger goes on the new movement if it has this option and then the rubber washer. Both go over that fat post that sticks out the front of the movement.

2. Mount the movement

The movement goes through the back of the dial toward the front. Put the brass washer and hex nut on next to secure the movement to the back of the clock dial. A clock dial is the part with the hands and numbers on it and is also called a clock face.

3. Hour hand

The hour hand goes on as a friction fit just twist and push.

4. Minute hand

The minute hand has an oblong hole and this goes onto the oblong shaft at the end of the hand shaft. The minute hand goes on and its nut secures it.

5. Second hand

If there is a second hand this goes on just by a friction fit and this would be last. Just stick it in the hole at the end of the hand shaft as a friction fit.

6. The finish line

Point the hands to whatever time it is and your done chime quartz movement installation.

Chime Quartz Movement Installation

Time Only Quartz Tabs

Assembly diagramQuartz removalQuartz installationWhat to measureMeasuring post lengthsDefinitions

Quartz Clock Movement Removal

This note explains quartz clock movement removal from the case. The following does not apply to quartz units made in Germany and also clock inserts. It is required that there is already access to both the back side and the dial side of the clock. There is no many case designs it would not be possible to cover this information. The clock case went to together so it comes apart that is the logic. So in whatever way we need to be able to access both the front dial and the back of the movement to continue.

Getting access to the dial area

There are many case designs and styles and there is no telling what way you're clock case is. Most times this is a very easy thing to do but of course there are some instances they do not make it user friendly. It is on the customers end to get to the dial and movement area to continue with the swap out.

Clock hand removal

Quartz Clock Movement Removal always needs the hands removed first. This is so there is access to the hardware that mounts the unit.

Minute hand

In the vast production of quartz clock movements exists mainly two styles of minute hands. One has the nut holding it secure and the other style is only on by friction fit. The friction fit has no nut and just pulls off with twist and pull at once. The other style has the nut on the top of the minute hand to hold it down and this is the style we work with here at clockworks.com. Removal is done by holding the minute hand while turning the nut to the left with needle nose pliers. Now it can taken off the rest of the way with the fingers instead of using the pliers.

Hour hand

Next is the hour hand, this is only a friction fit with a round hole in the hand, the tube its on is tapered fatter as it goes down into the movement. Just twist the hand and pull it toward you until it comes off.

Second hand

If there is a second hand on the clock, it only needs to be grabbed with the thumb nails and pulled straight off of the clock to take it off.

- - The content of this web page and web site was written and copyright by James Stoudenmire of Clockworks.com - It may not be used commercially without permission. - -

Quartz clock movement installation

This is a quick step by step practical guide for the quartz clock movement installation. The first step is to get the old unit out of the way. This is done by removing the hands from the clock and then the hex nut that is located under where the hands used to be. The movement will fall out the back of the clock dial. now it is out of the way and you can put in your new fine quartz clock movement you bought from clockworks.com. Quartz clock movement installation is very easy usually. These are the assembly instructions for the time only quartz clock movement into the clock case.

Sequential order of installation

  • 1. Place the steel hanger over the threaded post (optional)
  • 2. Place black rubber washer on the post next (optional)
  • 3. Start mounting the movement by putting the post through the dial
  • 4. Slide the brass washer onto the post of the movement that is sticking out of the clock dial
  • 5. Put hex nut on post and tighten to hold movement to the back of the clock face.
  • 6. Push hour hand on the post by friction fit
  • 7. Put the minute hand on the post
  • 8. If using a second hand install now by friction. The post just sticks into the end and use the doughnut.
  • 9. If not using a second hand just secure the minute hand with the pretty cap nut.

The movement is now installed

This applies to all battery operated clock movements available on clockworks.com. Such as chiming quartz, time only, with the only exception being the clock inserts.

- - The content of this web page and web site was written and copyright by James Stoudenmire of Clockworks.com - It may not be used commercially without permission. - -

Quartz clock movement measuring

When the quartz clock movement is ordered it will ask for the post length. A hex nut will be on this threaded post that is to be measured. A hex nut is a 6 sided nut that secures the movement to the back of the clock dial. A clock dial is the thing with the numbers on it also called a clock face. The dial may or may not have a wood backing to it. With a wood backing the dial or face would be thicker and need a longer post. Clockworks.com offers multiple post lengths on the quartz movements for this reason. The post has to be long enough to go through whatever thickness we are calling the dial.

How to measure quartz clock movement post

What to measure

When replacing a quartz clock movement you will need to measure the post on the old unit. This is so you can match it up with your new quartz movement. The post is the part that goes through the dial (face) and mounts from the front. This applies all clockworks.com quartz movements including chiming quartz, time only quartz.

- - The content of this web page and web site was written and copyright by James Stoudenmire of Clockworks.com - It may not be used commercially without permission. - -

Measuring quartz post lengths

To replace a quartz clock movements we need to do some measuring to get the post length. The post has to stick out through the front of the clock dial. It has to stick out on the front side enough to put on the hex nut on. The movement would then be secured to the back of the dial (clock face) so it will stay and not move. So the movement will turn and the hands will point to the right place where it was set.

Use the chart if building a clock

The below chart will tell us what size post is required to be able to go through the thickness of the clock dial. Again, all that is needed is the post to be longer than the thickness of the clock dial. A clock dial is the face or you can say the thing with the numbers on it.

Measure if replacing a clock

If replacing a movement and not building clocks it maybe easier to just measure the old post instead. Remove the quartz clock movement first by removing the hands and then the hex nut. Next measure the threaded post that the hex nut was on only. Only measure the fat part of the hand shaft that we call a post, this is the part that takes the hex nut only. This is the part that secures the movement to the dial and is all that needs to be measured. The old unit fit before its the correct post length you will need for your brand new quartz clock movement. This applies to all quartz clock movements available on clockworks.com. Such as chiming quartz and time only quartz.

Dial Thickness

  • 1/16 inch thick
  • 3/16 inch thick
  • 5/16 inch thick
  • 9/16 inch thick
  • 3/4 inch thick

Size Post Needed

  • 3/16"
  • 5/16"
  • 7/16"
  • 11/16"
  • 15/16"
How to measure quartz clock movement post

- - The content of this web page and web site was written and copyright by James Stoudenmire of Clockworks.com - It may not be used commercially without permission. - -

Quartz clock movement glossary

The quartz clock movement glossary below are the terms typically used when replacing a unit. This will help us understand the instructions for building or replacing quartz clock movements.

Clock Dial Dial =

The clock dial is the thing with the numbers on it that you tell the time with. Sometimes called the clock face and can come in any size or shape as long as there is indicators as to what the time is.

Quartz clock dial Post =

Threaded portion on the movement that takes the hex nut. This is the fat part of the quartz clock movements hands shaft, and this part sticks through the back of the dial to the front to get mounted with a hex nut.

Quartz clock mounting hex nut Hex Nut =

A six sided nut that threads onto the movement post. This secures the movement to the back of the dial so it will stay there. The movements post sticks out just enough to get this hex nut on and so everything is secure and ready for the clock hands.

Quartz clock movement hanger Hanger =

A hanger is the steel part to hang clock up on the wall and comes with the time only series quartz clock movements. The hanger is included with the quartz clock movement, but optional to use.

Quartz clock hands Hands =

Quartz clock hands are measured by the minute hand only. They come as a set when ordered, the hour hand is smaller and shorter of course but we only measure the length of the minute hand from the center of the mount to the end. This applies to quartz clock movement hands only. (battery run)

Quartz clock movement second hand Second Hand =

The second hand is the skinny hand that goes very fast on the clock. There are two types of second hand motions, one will sweep around in a continuous fashion. These types of quartz clock movements are called a continuous sweep. If the movement jumps from one second to the next we call it a step motion instead. The second hands are mounted with a tube that is on the hand itself. This tube sticks friction fit into the end of the quartz clock movements hand shaft.

- - The content of this web page and web site was written and copyright by James Stoudenmire of Clockworks.com - It may not be used commercially without permission. - -

Cuckoo Movement Tabs

Cuckoo Clock MovementWhy order a new?How to orderBasic InstallationWill Not StrikeRegula IdentificationCM to Inches

Please view these information tabs to learn more about replacing a cuckoo clock movement.

Why a new cuckoo movement

A new cuckoo clock movement will be a fraction of the price of an overhaul on the old one. Why have an old cuckoo clock movement serviced when the new one is the same unit for less? Even the best clock maker cant make a cuckoo movement better than a new one that would be impossible.

How the cuckoo movements come

A new cuckoo clock movement is factory lubricated and tested. The movement is still being made so the cost is less and availability is high. How long will the new one last? Well think about how long the old one lasted. Was it 20 or 30 years? Well it would make sense the new one would last that much longer. The movement comes with the chains, the hooks and rings for the chains and the hand hardware. A cuckoo clock movement repair will not last like a new movement would, and it is more expensive to have it repaired than just getting a new one.

To attempt to repair this is very time consuming and therefore costly. In addition to this, the entire clock has to be shipped and the case usually incurs extensive damage as it makes it's travels. This is the reason we no longer accept cuckoo clocks for repair.

The new one is less cost and lasts longer both so the replace choice is a pretty easy decision to make. The cuckoo clock is up and running quickly instead of slow. Now that is not to say they are easy to put in, sometimes they can drive someone crazy. If cuckoo has multiple functions it will be more challenging. Things like music and water wheels and people dancing. These do not come with instructions as there are so many variations we have cant cover all the cuckoos. Its best to just look in the back of the clock and see for your self what needs to be done. This way you can judge yourself if its something you would like to try to swap out. If it all goes south we can bail you out here for a fee if you choose to send it in.

- - The content of this web page and web site was written and copyright by James Stoudenmire of Clockworks.com - It may not be used commercially without permission. - -

Ordering The Cuckoo Movement

Offering post WW2 German made cuckoo clock movements only, prior to this would be considered antique. Antique cuckoo clocks made during and before the second war have movements that are no longer made. The only thing to do is get the movement overhauled by href="/clock-repair/mechanical-clock-movement-restoration.html">a clock maker. As for the post 1950 clocks, the Regula company of Germany produced way more cuckoo clock movements than anyone else in history. So the movements offered and the information provided is with the Regula cuckoo clock movements as center focus.

The back plate of the cuckoo clock movements will be some numbers stamped in the brass. Regula puts there mark above and slightly to the right of the wheel that lifts the bellow wires. It will be stamped 25L or 34XL or 72 and the similar, with 25 being the most common unit made. The Regula 25 is about 75% of the post war cuckoo clock movements in the world. It is the very popular two weight movement that runs for one day per wind up.

How many weights

Regula 25 indicates a two weight movement that runs one day per wind. A two weight movement maybe installed on a clock with three weights on it. If you look in the back sometimes there maybe three weights on the clock, but only two will go into the movement. The other weight drives the music or a dancer platform up on the top. But even if there is three weights on the clock, it would take only a two weight movement usually. It is best to check to see how many weights are used on the movement itself when working with a three weight clock.

Dancing People Platform

You may or may not have dancers on a spinning platform up on top of the movement. We need to figure out if the dancer platform is separate or part of the clock movement. The ones that are attached to the movement will come out with the movement, and need to order one with the dancer platform installed. The dancers are only press fit onto the platform unless someone glued them on over the years. Just twist and pull at the same time in the up direction with your fingers. If they break we sell them if they are the common dancing people and not a special design. To get the new movement with the dancer platform it will ask you for the dancer height. This is measured from the top of the movement to the top of the platform where the dancers feet were.

Measuring the pendulum drop

The measurement from the suspension post down to the center of the pendulum leaf is called a drop. The pendulum drop is the measurement from the top of the clock movement to the center of the pendulum leaf. This measurement is very approximate and it does not have to be exact. The pendulum leaf can slide up or down but we want the measurement to the center where it used to keep approximate time. If the clocks time should be faster just slide the leaf up more on its pendulum stick. The opposite way of course for slowing it down.

Ordering The Cuckoo Movement

We have the numbers from the back of the movement. We know how many weights are on the cuckoo clock. If there is a dancer table or not, and if so what the height is. Now it is time to look for our clock movement on the web page.

The point of no return

It is not uncommon for a customer to order a cuckoo clock movement and insist the movement is not working. We cant take them back because they customized to fit the customers clock. Of course there is no way to fix it up like new again and resell it. We end up being out of the cost for the movement and shipping. We no longer take returns on these movements, cuckoo clock movement installation is done at your own risk. These units are tested and brand new, they work perfect and will for you also it they are put in right.

- - The content of this web page and web site was written and copyright by James Stoudenmire of Clockworks.com - It may not be used commercially without permission. - -

Cuckoo Clock Movement Installation

There is alot going on in a tight area with cuckoo clocks. It takes some patience sometimes to get these right. The thing with cuckoo clocks is the more stuff going on, the harder it is to swap the cuckoo clock movement. Things like dancers, wood chopper, bell ringers, water wheels and the sort can complicate things.

Cuckoo Clock Movement Installation

  • Take off the hands, unhook the bird off of the door and remove the hooks and rings from the chains, then flip the clock over.
  • Take the back off and undo the bellow wires off of their lifters. This is done by opening the loop that lifts the bellow wires up and down. Open the loop with a small flat screwdriver by twisting it so it will open.
  • Next, take out the bellows by unscrewing the screw on the outside of the side of the cuckoo clock case. The bellows will now come out and you can take the four screws out that hold the cuckoo clock movement in.
  • When you receive your new cuckoo clock movement, the arm that the bird sits on will have to be bent and cut to size. Then you can take the bird off of the old cuckoo clock movement. This is done by loosening the birds set screw and put it on the new unit.
  • Installation is then the reverse of what you did to remove the movement.

Bending the bird arm into position

The cuckoo movements have a bird arm that needs adjusting. This is the bar or wire that the bird sits on and secured with a set screw. It comes way to long and must be shortened and then bent. After cutting to size it must be bent into a 90 degree angle. This bend must be done right the first time or its difficult to correct. The correct way to do adjust this bird arm wire is as follows.

  • Measure the complete bird arm wire on the old unit, including the right angled section.
  • Cut the new units bird wire to the same size.

Matching the bird arm with the old movement

Take note of your old unit if the arm is forward or back, you want the arm forward on the old and the new. This is to avoid an improper 90 degree bend. A proper bend will be when both movements are set the same with the bird arm. They are both set so the bird coming out with the arm forward to the front of the movement. Both units set the same way so the bird is forward, then make the bend nice and straight. Otherwise it will be hard to correct as one 90 degree will not be in forward when the other one is, and will result in having to correct. How you put the arm forward is to make the clock in strike mode. Or you could say cuckoo mode, when the bird is forward toward the front.

Measure where the bend is on the old movement and then go ahead and bend the new units bird arm to a right angle. At the same location as the old one (where the arm is even with the front of the movement, not back)

- - The content of this web page and web site was written and copyright by James Stoudenmire of Clockworks.com - It may not be used commercially without permission. - -

New cuckoo clock movement not striking

When the new cuckoo clock movement will not go into striking mode for the hours. The bird will not come out and the clock will not indicate what time it is with the cuckoo call. Here are some guidelines on what to check in this situation.

See if the cuckoo door is latched shut

There is a wire above the cuckoo door that locks it into the closed position. This is for either shipping the clock and also for chime shut off. It is a small wire that stops the door and just gets turned to either in the way or out of the way of the door. Be sure it is out of the way so the door can open and it can cuckoo.

Check the silence lever

There may be a silence lever if the cuckoo movement has one. This would be located on the side of the cuckoo clock movement and stick outside of the clock case. Push it down for cuckoo on and up for cuckoo shut off usually. Just move it to the opposite direction and see if the clock will strike out the cuckoo calls. If the movement has a silence switch that does not stick outside of the case it may still be on the movement itself. Just look at the back of the clock with the back panel off and you may see the silence switch. You will see a lever on your right as you face the back of the movement on the top side. Not all cuckoos have this feature as the manufacturer will assume you will silence the cuckoo just by locking the bird door.

Clock chain resistance

Be sure nothing is in the way of the chain that drives the striking side of the cuckoo clock. One weight controls the time and the other the strike. If the chain is rubbing anything like the hole in the bottom of the cuckoo case it will be just like not having enough weight to make it run. The chain that holds the weight should be straight from the ratchet wheel and down without rubbing anything. Also the side of the chain that there is no weight attached to cant be caught up on anything also. This is the side that you pull to raise the weight on the other side of the chain loop.

Bellow lift wires in the way

On a new movement install it is required to bend the lift wires so they do not get caught up on each other. During the travel up to lift the bellows they could be hitting each other and creating resistance. These just get bent this way or that way so they can go up and down with the bellow tops. If the bellow top is broken or ripped it can cause this to happen also.

Bird arm position

The arm that the bird rests on could be bent in a way that it is trying to go forward too much. Therefore it hits the front of the clock case instead of in a position where it just opens the door. The intent is for it to open the cuckoo door only and not hit the front of the clock case. It will only cuckoo if the bird arm is able to be all the way forward with no resistance.

Cuckoo door opening wire

If this wire is too long it will try to open the door too much. With the door open too much it will not be able to start the cuckoo strike. The solution is to make the door wire shorter or put a bend in it. Putting a bend in this wire so its sort of a hump instead of straight will be the same thing as making it shorter.

Cuckoo Clock Not Striking Conclusion

If the cuckoo will not go into striking mode is caused by resistance. There is only like 4 or 5 gears that have to spin around to make the clock cuckoo. If there is any resistance for this to happen it will not function. These 4 -5 gears need to spin to have the bellows lift and open the cuckoo door at the same time. There is much action that is dictated by these few gears spinning, any resistance in any part will stop it from working.

- - The content of this web page and web site was written and copyright by James Stoudenmire of Clockworks.com - It may not be used commercially without permission. - -

Regula Cuckoo Movement Identification

Most cuckoo clocks made after 1950 have movements that are made by the Regula cuckoo clock movement company. If you have a cuckoo made after this time it would be about 80% chance. The identification will reveal it being made by the Regula cuckoo clock movement company most of the time. But let us be certain with these methods of identification.

Two train or three train movements

If the clock has two weights running the movement we can find out quick if its made by Regula. When we say two weights, we mean on the movement only. There maybe three weights on the clock, but only two weights are on the movement itself. In other words there are three train movements that take three weights, this is correct. However we are talking about two weights on the movement regardless if the clock has three weights on it. One could be for the music box that is separate from the movement itself. If the movement itself takes two weights, we call this a two train movement. This is because the movement has two sides of gears from big to little inside the plates. One for cuckoo and one for the time. If the clock movement itself takes three weights this of course is a three train movement.

Two train, two weight Regula Identification

See if your cuckoo movement says 25 or 34 on it above the spiked wheel that makes the bellows go up and down. Above this wheel and to the right alittle, these numbers will be stamped in the brass. It may have more numbers or letters after the 25 or 34 but don't pay attention to anything but the a href="/product/regula-25-cuckoo-movement">25 or 34 for now. If you have a href="/product/regula-25-cuckoo-movement">25 or 34 on the back, your in the right section and your clock is made by Regula. 25 means it is a one day clock that takes two weights. 34 means it is an eight day clock movement that runs on two weights.

These are the very most two common cuckoo clock movements made in the world. The 25 or 34 identification stamp alone means it was made by the Regula factory of Germany.

The two styles of the two weight movements

The two train, two weight movements come in two styles. One with a dancer platform and one without the dancer platform. Keep in mind just because you have dancers on your cuckoo clock, this does not mean it is attached. You can have a two weight cuckoo clock with dancers, but the dancers are not attached to the movement itself. This is an important distinction when ordering a new cuckoo clock movement.

The two weight cuckoo movements with the dancer platform attached comes exactly this way, with the platform. The platform come in a few heights above the clock movement, so this will be measured if getting a new one. The dancer platform height is the distance from the top of the movement to the platform base itself.

The clock may still say 25 on it for one day and 34 for eight day. However with these same identification marks they have either the platform or no platform. These same numbers maybe on the movement regardless if there are dancers or not.

Summery

  • Figure out if you have a 2 or 3 train movement
  • Determine if you have a dancer platform, and if so if it is attached to the movement
  • Look for identification markings on the back plate of the brass for a number 25 or 34
  • Order the dancer Regula or non dancer Regula 25 one day or 34 eight day movement

- - The content of this web page and web site was written and copyright by James Stoudenmire of Clockworks.com - It may not be used commercially without permission. - -

The following chart has the most common CM measurements converted to inches.
  • 2.54 CM = 1 inch
  • 25.4 MM = 1 inch
  • 19.5cm = 7 3/4"
  • 23.5cm = 9 1/4"
  • 28.5cm = 10 1/2"
  • 40.05cm = 15 3/4"
  • Cuckoo Clock Parts (10)
  • Hands (4)
  • Hardware (4)
  • Mainsprings (8)
  • Movement Parts (2)
  • Pendulums (5)
  • Weights (2)
  • Anniversary Clock Parts (6)
  • Chimes and Gongs (3)
  • Clock Dials (4)
  • Clock Keys (3)