Cuckoo Clocks

Urgos Tabs

Urgos Clock MovementWhy get a new Urgos?IdentificationUrgos AvailabilityNot on the list?Urgos UW 7/** IssueUrgos UW 6/** issue

Please view these information tabs to learn more about Hermle or Urgos clock movement availability

Urgos clock movement - Why New?

Urgos clock movement - Why New is because new movement will last much longer than a repair ever would. It would usually cost less and be up and running in a very short time whereas a repair can take months. The new movement would be faster, cost less, and would last a lot longer. This is because a repair on the unit is a very time consuming process and the movement would be disassembled and reassembled for this. The only time you should have the movement serviced is if it is out of production and not available new, or it is a very high end movement such as a tubular bell if it makes economic sense to do so.

The Movement

The movement will come lubricated with clock oil already, so there is no need to oil it. The clock comes with its cables and pulleys or chains, comes also with the leader and suspension spring. This is everything that comes out when you remove the two screws that are under the movement. Once you get the hands and the clock dial out of the way (instructions included) its only a matter of removing the two screws that go up into the movement to secure it. The new movement can be swapped out by me in 10 or 15 minutes, so figure a little longer for some one who is not used to it, but it just shows its not that hard. There are some instances where someone created there own clock case, and built it sort of weird and it makes it tricky, but this is not so common.

Urgos clock movement - Why New? I think we pretty much covered it. Its less than half the cost of an overhaul typically, instant instead of months later, the longest lasting of the choices. So with that said, its time to get the numbers off of the back plate of the movement itself so we can match it up to the brand new clock movement.

  • Half the cost of a overhaul
  • Lasts twice as long as a overhaul
  • Get it now instead of months later
  • Comes with cables or chains
  • Already oiled and test ran
  • Comes with instructions and support

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Urgos Clock Movement Identification

>Urgos Clock Movement Identification is done by getting to the back of the brass mechanical clock movement. Often there are side access panels to the clock if it is a floor clock. You can remove the side access panel and look inside with a flashlight to get the information off of the back plate. If you have a cell phone you can reach in and take a pic of the back of the movement to see the numbers also. Taking the movement right out of the case is an option as well, since you will be ordering a different one anyway. The numbers are located on the bottom of the back plate of the brass movement itself. Not on the paperwork or the clock case, only on the brass movement.

Urgos clock movements have changed numbering systems many years ago. What this means is the movement you have now may have some markings on it, such as UW32/1A, but this same unit is now called UW32319 as they have a new number for the exact same movement. If you have an old number style and need to convert to the new number, the movement has definitely lived its life span and it's time to replace it.

The old numbers to the new numbers can be confusing, an example being UW32/1 and UW32001 and UW32319 are all the same unit. Best to use the chart to figure out the new number and if it is not on the list, just give us a call or email to [email protected] and we will assist with the old to new Urgos Clock Movement Identification.

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Urgos clock movement availability

Urgos clock movement availability is pretty good for the floor clock mechanical movements only. They no longer product any mantle or shelf spring driven clock movements such as the UW6/** series. The UW7/** series is also discontinued and what is left being made is the three weight floor grandfather - grandmother clock models. Even with a three weight clock movement made by Urgos does not completely mean its in stock with us. There are some units that are rendered obsolete such as some chain driven UW660** units and others.

These units that are no longer being made still have hope, we can usually create a new movement conversion to what is in production still. The conversion may require certain actions to be done such as getting a new dial with the new movement. In some situations we can provide the movement with an alternate CM length and customize your current pendulum to fit easy, things like this.

The new movement is definitely the way to go if at all possible. If the clock movement is 30 years old, its time to just swap it out. The reasons are listed in another section, but in short these are the reasons. The price is a fraction of the cost of an overhaul on the old one, ships now, lasts longer than any repair ever could. Even if the clock is sentimental which it often is, keep the case sentimental and not the clock movement.

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Finding a Urgos Clock Movement - No Luck?

Finding a Urgos Clock Movement - No Luck getting one may mean it is no longer made. The UW6/** and the UW7/** units are no longer made, in fact the only movements made is the 3 weight floor models and even then its not 100%. If your lucky enough to find the new movement its best to buy it without thinking about it too much because it may not be available in the future. If your the owner of an obsolete clock movement we can still help you with a new unit, please email [email protected] with the numbers.

If your movement numbers match with the numbers we list here on Clockworks.com, just find the number and click the link to view and order the product. If your movement number is not on the above list we need to figure out what the new number is for your unit and if its still made. What the numbers used to be, are not the same on the new units although it is indeed the same clock movement.

To convert your three weight Urgos clock movement to the new number, please use the below chart to match what the movement used to be called to what it is now called by its new number, then order that new number with the above links.

If you have a / in the number, it’s definitely the old system and therefore an older movement which has lived its life as its over 40 years old. If it does not have a / it still may be the old numbering system as well. Either way, convert old number to the new and order the new unit with the above links.

One more thing about the old to new numbers: if the old numbers have a / in it, replace that / with one or sometimes two zeros if the / is in the middle of the old numbers. EXAMPLE: 32/1 is the same as 32001 and is the same as the converted number 32319. If there is a letter at the end like 32/1A, ignore the A and pretend it does not exist. Same with the 03 series, for example 3/12 is the same as 03012 and is the same as the new number 03096. Wow, huh? Confusing sometimes. Just call us if you like with the numbers and we can sort it out for you. 800-381-7458, if you get VM it only means we are already on the phone, we will call you right back. Our email address is [email protected] if you choose to do that instead.

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Urgos UW7/ series clock movement

Urgos UW7/ series clock movement is a two weight small floor clock movement. These units were very popular in the 1970s, and that puts it over the life expectancy of being a 25 year movement by far. This means your left with a choice to replace the movement or get a new one. The choice is still obvious to get the new one for cost savings, speed and life expectancy. Even in this situation when the movement is not made, if you can get a conversion to a different maker it is still the best choice.

Urgos UW7/ series clock movement is no longer made and no longer available by Clockworks.com. However we can often convert these to an equivalent quality new German clock movement with ease. If you provide the movement numbers off of the unit and email this information to us at [email protected] we can see what we can do. It would help if you provide the length of the pendulum from tip to tip when its off of the clock. Also the length of the hands shaft from the front plate of the movement itself and all the way out to the end of the minute hand nut threads. This last measurement is not so easy to get, the dial comes off for this to be done and there is some gears in the way. But again, this measurement is from the front plate of the movement and all the way out. A movement plate is the two plates with all the gears in between and there is a front plate with its hand shaft sticking out, and a back plate.

- - The content of this web page and web site was written and copyright by James Stoudenmire of Clockworks.com - It may not be used commercially without permission. - -

Urgos UW6/ series clock movement

Urgos UW6/ series clock movement was mass produced in the 1970's and was a popular shelf clock movement. It was spring driven and ran for eight days on a single wind up. It chimed either Westminster only or three songs triple chime. These nice mantle and shelf clock movements are no longer made, but its still the best choice to go with a new movement via conversion if we can do it for you.

This movement is no longer available brand new as it has not been produced for a long time. It is best to get the closest equivalent movement to this old Urgos unit. We have a Hermle unit that is of equal quality to replace this however. A Hermle unit is very close to what you have now, only the locations of the winders on the movement are in slightly different locations. So what this means is the holes in the clock dial face, where you wind the clock, will not line up with this new movement. You will need to cover the old winding holes somehow and drill new ones, or even better get a new dial with your new movement. The dials are a tricky thing, as sometimes we will have them pre-punched for the movement you are ordering, and sometimes we do not have them pre-punched.

If we have to send one with no punching, you will have to drill the holes to wind the clock on your end. To determine if we have a dial for you in punched or un-punched we would need a picture of the dial you now have so we can attempt to duplicate it with something from our stock, preferably with the punching predrilled so you can wind the clock. So please email us a picture of your old dial to [email protected] with the dimensional sizes of the clock dial you now have.

- - The content of this web page and web site was written and copyright by James Stoudenmire of Clockworks.com - It may not be used commercially without permission. - -

Clock Kit Tabs

Mechanical Clock KitsTypes of clock kitsMovement optionsGet the kit before making the caseMaking the seat board

Please view these information tabs to help with determining the proper Mechanical Clock Kits for your clock case.

Mechanical Clock Kit Styles Available

Mechanical Clock Kit Styles Available include wall clocks, mantle (shelf) clocks, and floor clocks. Floor models includes the grand daughter, mother, and father series.

Chime types

All of the above, in the past, have been made with every chime type. In other words there are all these various ways to make noise, lets list them. There is the quarterly sounds that play a tune ever quarter hour, this are most common in the songs Westminster only, Or triple chime that includes Westminster St Micheal, or Wittington. As for the other noise makers, we call them strike clocks because they only strike out the hours and usually bong once on the half hour. These include Gong strike (coiled gong on the back or below the movement), Bell strike, or Bim Bam (sounds like its name, on two or three strike rods). Now that is not to say every one of these chime types are available for every type of clock kit in the world today, but those cover most of clocks ever produced in history.

Mechanical clock kits

Mechanical Clock Kit Styles are listed below, these are the names of the types of clocks you will see in the world. They are the clocks that you could potentially replicate in the modern world.

Wall / Mantle kits

Either weight driven or spring, but usually spring driven. The weight driven is less common because of all the weight that is hanging on the wall. Usually spring driven, with or without a pendulum. If there is no pendulum this means it has a balance wheel instead more like a watch.

Granddaughter / Grandmother clock kits

Granddaughters are usually spring driven with no weights. The grandmothers are usually chain driven with three weights for the chime units or two weights for any other strike styles. Its a shorter clock overall compared to the grandfather clocks.

Grandfather clock kits

Typically cable driven with three weights and triple chimes. This means the weights will hang on cables instead of chains, and plays your choice of three songs. Not always triple chime because some are Westminster only. This is the largest and tallest of the floor clocks.

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Mechanical clock-kit movement options

The following are the various options for Mechanical clock-kit movements to be utilized in building a clock. We offer predefined kits at clockworks.com, however we cant include them all as it would overwhelming. It maybe possible to alter any aspect in the predefined clock kits that are listed. Please call to let us help with kit modifications or just general assistance to 800 381 7458.


Floor Clocks

Chime type

Either Westminster only or triple chime. Both of these Mechanical Clock Kit options play a melody every 15 minutes and require a three weight movement. Also there is the bell strike option that will play on the top of the hour whatever hour it is, and once on the half hour.

Pendulum

Options are the length, the bob diameter, and if you would like a wood stick style The Pendulum or a fancy lyre style The Pendulum. The wood stick style is more antique look and the lyre is the contemporary style.

Hammer location

Either on the back for standard depth cases, or for the shallow depth we can do a side hammer unit.

Dial

Either a phase of the moon style, or just the hump top that says Tempus Fugit. Or we can zip off any moon The Dial or TF dial to provide a very nice square metal dial for you with no hump on the top at all. Another option is to use heavy paper stock on a thin board, use spray glue to make it stay.


Wall Clocks

Chime type

Either Westminster only, Triple chime, Bim Bam, gong or bell. Lots of chime options there, but whatever you would like to listen to out of these we can do usually.

Pendulum

Either the wood stick style or sometimes if its short enough, we can put a brass rod pendulum in. The Mechanical Clock Kit options brass rod pendulum is different than the fancy lyre pendulum as its just a brass rod going straight down with out all the decor.

Hammer Location

Includes the back, or on the side, or even the bottom on the wall clock kits.

Dial

Square dial made of paper stock that gets spray glued to a thin board, or a metal dial. In Arabic or Roman numerals. The dial on a wall clock would be mounted to the wood trim that goes around the dial, not interlocking with the movement. One style you cant get these days are the round dials that do lock into the movement, to have the appearance of the dial just floating in the air with the mounting hidden such as the Vienna regulator style.


Mantle or Shelf Clocks

Chime type

Is all of them really, you can have Westminster, triple chime, gong, bell, or Bim Bam strike for Mechanical clock movement kit options.

Pendulum

Options include metal rod to a decor for the kitchen style clocks are available, or a wood stick The Pendulum if the clock is tall enough. For the shorter mantle units it will be just a round bob that is usually adjustable for time keeping.

Dial

The hardest on the mantle units. To get a The Dial with bezel with glass in convex or flat is ideal, however not always possible. If the situation calls for this type of clock dial, you may want to chase a different clock design to make, it is not often it works out well unfortunately. The shelf clocks are easier as it has a door that closes with glass in the front, rather than the round brass bezel with dial and glass all in one combination.


This concludes the Mechanical Clock Kit options. Best to call and discuss the clock kits with us at 800 381 7458

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Clock kit first - Build the case second

It is important to order the clock kit before building the clock case. If the case is built before getting the Mechanical Clock Kit it is possible the kit will not fit.

Why order first

It is possible to have a difficultly finding or adapting a clock movement kit to the current case built. The ideal dial size or other things would wanted but these items may not exist in the size needed for the case. Measurements that need to be correct for the clock kit to fit into the case. Order the Mechanical Clock Kit before building the case. With the kit set up on a stand while working on the case it can be measured. The various items on the kit such as the pendulum swing and dial size is known exactly.

What is not available

Clockworks.com offers a large variety of clock movements so this is the most easy thing to get. However when it comes to some components the resources can get slim on specific requests. Clock dials are the hardest part because there are so many shapes sizes and options. Such as round, square, hump top with no moon, hump with moon. Then you have all sorts of sizes, many of the antique clocks had clock dials that are in a size that is just not made on the market anymore. The grandfather clocks back in the day had over sized Clock dials with ships on them, cant get those anymore, as well as many other ones. Also you have to wind most clocks (unless they are chain driven) through the dial with a key. In other words the dial needs to be drilled out for the specific movement you ordered.

Summery

It is wise to get the Mechanical Clock Kit before building the clock case. Besides it will give an opportunity to set the movement kit up in your work shop to look at, get used too it, and measure for yourself what is needed.

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Making a Seat Board

A seat board is the mount that the weight driven movement sits upon. The movement sits on this with the cables or chains hanging directly down between the boards.

Many of the modern clocks have this about 16 inches wide and is 2 and a half inches deep but this would vary on the clock case dimensions being worked on. In the center of the mounting board is a hole that is 1 inch wide going across the center of the 2 and a half inch deep seat board.

The hole is wide enough for the movement to sit on the board with its chains hanging down in the center. Then the screws with the rectangle washers seat board screws and washers can go up into the movement’s arbors on the bottom. Even easier would be just to mount two, three quarter or 1 inch square boards running parallel, which are 1 inch apart, across the inside of the clock case, this is really all a mounting board needs to consist of. The only thing that has to happen is the movement is in the air with the chains dangling down in between these boards. The boards just can’t be so wide that the pendulum rubs it on the back of the movement.

With the movement mounting in the air as described all that needs to be done is have the chimeblock mounted on the back of the clock case so the hammers can engage with them and make the chime sound. You will hang the weights and pendulum on the movement obvious places, and lock the dial into the movement from the front.

- - The content of this web page and web site was written and copyright by James Stoudenmire of Clockworks.com - It may not be used commercially without permission. - -

Chime Quartz Tabs

Chiming Pendulum Quartz Clock MovementsRemovalInstallationWhat To MeasureDial Thickness To Post SizeDefinitionsPendulum Hits Sides

Please view these information tabs - Chiming Pendulum Quartz Clock Movements can come with or without chimes, and with or with out a pendulum.

Quartz Clock Movement Removal

This note explains quartz clock movement removal from the case. The following does not apply to quartz units made in Germany and also clock inserts. It is required that there is already access to both the back side and the dial side of the clock. There is no many case designs it would not be possible to cover this information. The clock case went to together so it comes apart that is the logic. So in whatever way we need to be able to access both the front dial and the back of the movement to continue.

Getting access to the dial area

There are many case designs and styles and there is no telling what way you're clock case is. Most times this is a very easy thing to do but of course there are some instances they do not make it user friendly. It is on the customers end to get to the dial and movement area to continue with the swap out.

Clock hand removal

Quartz Clock Movement Removal always needs the hands removed first. This is so there is access to the hardware that mounts the unit.

Minute hand

In the vast production of quartz clock movements exists mainly two styles of minute hands. One has the nut holding it secure and the other style is only on by friction fit. The friction fit has no nut and just pulls off with twist and pull at once. The other style has the nut on the top of the minute hand to hold it down and this is the style we work with here at clockworks.com. Removal is done by holding the minute hand while turning the nut to the left with needle nose pliers. Now it can taken off the rest of the way with the fingers instead of using the pliers.

Hour hand

Next is the hour hand, this is only a friction fit with a round hole in the hand, the tube its on is tapered fatter as it goes down into the movement. Just twist the hand and pull it toward you until it comes off.

Second hand

If there is a second hand on the clock, it only needs to be grabbed with the thumb nails and pulled straight off of the clock to take it off.

- - The content of this web page and web site was written and copyright by James Stoudenmire of Clockworks.com - It may not be used commercially without permission. - -

Chime Quartz Movement Installation

The following is the basic installation for a chiming quartz movement from clockworks.com. There is more to do with whatever specific chime unit purchased however this will get it mounted. Each unit is varied with there chime functions and speaker style so it would be required to see individual instructions for this information.

Installation sequence

The sequence of installation of these fine quartz clock movements. The movements come with two different minute hand nuts. One is a cap nut if no second hand is used, the other one is a doughnut style and this is used if there is a second hand. The intent is to use one nut and toss out the other one that is not needed.

1. Hanger and rubber washer

Hanger goes on the new movement if it has this option and then the rubber washer. Both go over that fat post that sticks out the front of the movement.

2. Mount the movement

The movement goes through the back of the dial toward the front. Put the brass washer and hex nut on next to secure the movement to the back of the clock dial. A clock dial is the part with the hands and numbers on it and is also called a clock face.

3. Hour hand

The hour hand goes on as a friction fit just twist and push.

4. Minute hand

The minute hand has an oblong hole and this goes onto the oblong shaft at the end of the hand shaft. The minute hand goes on and its nut secures it.

5. Second hand

If there is a second hand this goes on just by a friction fit and this would be last. Just stick it in the hole at the end of the hand shaft as a friction fit.

6. The finish line

Point the hands to whatever time it is and your done chime quartz movement installation.

Chime Quartz Movement Installation

Quartz clock movement measuring

When the quartz clock movement is ordered it will ask for the post length. A hex nut will be on this threaded post that is to be measured. A hex nut is a 6 sided nut that secures the movement to the back of the clock dial. A clock dial is the thing with the numbers on it also called a clock face. The dial may or may not have a wood backing to it. With a wood backing the dial or face would be thicker and need a longer post. Clockworks.com offers multiple post lengths on the quartz movements for this reason. The post has to be long enough to go through whatever thickness we are calling the dial.

How to measure quartz clock movement post

What to measure

When replacing a quartz clock movement you will need to measure the post on the old unit. This is so you can match it up with your new quartz movement. The post is the part that goes through the dial (face) and mounts from the front. This applies all clockworks.com quartz movements including chiming quartz, time only quartz.

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Measuring quartz post lengths

To replace a quartz clock movements we need to do some measuring to get the post length. The post has to stick out through the front of the clock dial. It has to stick out on the front side enough to put on the hex nut on. The movement would then be secured to the back of the dial (clock face) so it will stay and not move. So the movement will turn and the hands will point to the right place where it was set.

Use the chart if building a clock

The below chart will tell us what size post is required to be able to go through the thickness of the clock dial. Again, all that is needed is the post to be longer than the thickness of the clock dial. A clock dial is the face or you can say the thing with the numbers on it.

Measure if replacing a clock

If replacing a movement and not building clocks it maybe easier to just measure the old post instead. Remove the quartz clock movement first by removing the hands and then the hex nut. Next measure the threaded post that the hex nut was on only. Only measure the fat part of the hand shaft that we call a post, this is the part that takes the hex nut only. This is the part that secures the movement to the dial and is all that needs to be measured. The old unit fit before its the correct post length you will need for your brand new quartz clock movement. This applies to all quartz clock movements available on clockworks.com. Such as chiming quartz and time only quartz.

Dial Thickness

  • 1/16 inch thick
  • 3/16 inch thick
  • 5/16 inch thick
  • 9/16 inch thick
  • 3/4 inch thick

Size Post Needed

  • 3/16"
  • 5/16"
  • 7/16"
  • 11/16"
  • 15/16"
How to measure quartz clock movement post

- - The content of this web page and web site was written and copyright by James Stoudenmire of Clockworks.com - It may not be used commercially without permission. - -

Quartz clock movement glossary

The quartz clock movement glossary below are the terms typically used when replacing a unit. This will help us understand the instructions for building or replacing quartz clock movements.

Clock Dial Dial =

The clock dial is the thing with the numbers on it that you tell the time with. Sometimes called the clock face and can come in any size or shape as long as there is indicators as to what the time is.

Quartz clock dial Post =

Threaded portion on the movement that takes the hex nut. This is the fat part of the quartz clock movements hands shaft, and this part sticks through the back of the dial to the front to get mounted with a hex nut.

Quartz clock mounting hex nut Hex Nut =

A six sided nut that threads onto the movement post. This secures the movement to the back of the dial so it will stay there. The movements post sticks out just enough to get this hex nut on and so everything is secure and ready for the clock hands.

Quartz clock movement hanger Hanger =

A hanger is the steel part to hang clock up on the wall and comes with the time only series quartz clock movements. The hanger is included with the quartz clock movement, but optional to use.

Quartz clock hands Hands =

Quartz clock hands are measured by the minute hand only. They come as a set when ordered, the hour hand is smaller and shorter of course but we only measure the length of the minute hand from the center of the mount to the end. This applies to quartz clock movement hands only. (battery run)

Quartz clock movement second hand Second Hand =

The second hand is the skinny hand that goes very fast on the clock. There are two types of second hand motions, one will sweep around in a continuous fashion. These types of quartz clock movements are called a continuous sweep. If the movement jumps from one second to the next we call it a step motion instead. The second hands are mounted with a tube that is on the hand itself. This tube sticks friction fit into the end of the quartz clock movements hand shaft.

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Quartz Pendulum Hits the Sides

Do you hear a bonk, bonk, bonk all day and night? This is because the pendulum bob keeps hitting the sides of the clock case with each swing. It may not stop the clock, the clock will work just fine. However the knocking sound of the pendulum hitting the sides of the clock case can be annoying. Lucky for us the correction is fairly simple on these pendulum quartz clock movements.

Why

A quartz pendulum hits the sides of the clock case happens when the magnet on the movement is too strong. Either the magnet is too strong or the bob on the pendulum is too wide. Both of these problems can be fixed easy.

The correction

The pendulum bob diameter can be swapped out for a smaller size. The alternative fix is to lessen the strength of the magnet on the back of the movement itself. I have heard of this being done with masking tape with good results. It just creates a slight barrier of the magnetic pull enough to reduce the overall swing of the pendulum. Either way, putting tape on the back or swapping out the bob, you will be left with a quiet clock again.

- - The content of this web page and web site was written and copyright by James Stoudenmire of Clockworks.com - It may not be used commercially without permission. - -

Chime Quartz Movement Installation

Chime Quartz Movement Installation

The following is the basic installation for a chiming quartz movement from clockworks.com. There is more to do with whatever specific chime unit purchased however this will get it mounted. Each unit is varied with there chime functions and speaker style so it would be required to see individual instructions for this information.

Installation sequence

The sequence of installation of these fine quartz clock movements. The movements come with two different minute hand nuts. One is a cap nut if no second hand is used, the other one is a doughnut style and this is used if there is a second hand. The intent is to use one nut and toss out the other one that is not needed.

1. Hanger and rubber washer

Hanger goes on the new movement if it has this option and then the rubber washer. Both go over that fat post that sticks out the front of the movement.

2. Mount the movement

The movement goes through the back of the dial toward the front. Put the brass washer and hex nut on next to secure the movement to the back of the clock dial. A clock dial is the part with the hands and numbers on it and is also called a clock face.

3. Hour hand

The hour hand goes on as a friction fit just twist and push.

4. Minute hand

The minute hand has an oblong hole and this goes onto the oblong shaft at the end of the hand shaft. The minute hand goes on and its nut secures it.

5. Second hand

If there is a second hand this goes on just by a friction fit and this would be last. Just stick it in the hole at the end of the hand shaft as a friction fit.

6. The finish line

Point the hands to whatever time it is and your done chime quartz movement installation.

Chime Quartz Movement Installation

Time Only Quartz Tabs

Assembly diagramQuartz removalQuartz installationWhat to measureMeasuring post lengthsDefinitions

Quartz Clock Movement Removal

This note explains quartz clock movement removal from the case. The following does not apply to quartz units made in Germany and also clock inserts. It is required that there is already access to both the back side and the dial side of the clock. There is no many case designs it would not be possible to cover this information. The clock case went to together so it comes apart that is the logic. So in whatever way we need to be able to access both the front dial and the back of the movement to continue.

Getting access to the dial area

There are many case designs and styles and there is no telling what way you're clock case is. Most times this is a very easy thing to do but of course there are some instances they do not make it user friendly. It is on the customers end to get to the dial and movement area to continue with the swap out.

Clock hand removal

Quartz Clock Movement Removal always needs the hands removed first. This is so there is access to the hardware that mounts the unit.

Minute hand

In the vast production of quartz clock movements exists mainly two styles of minute hands. One has the nut holding it secure and the other style is only on by friction fit. The friction fit has no nut and just pulls off with twist and pull at once. The other style has the nut on the top of the minute hand to hold it down and this is the style we work with here at clockworks.com. Removal is done by holding the minute hand while turning the nut to the left with needle nose pliers. Now it can taken off the rest of the way with the fingers instead of using the pliers.

Hour hand

Next is the hour hand, this is only a friction fit with a round hole in the hand, the tube its on is tapered fatter as it goes down into the movement. Just twist the hand and pull it toward you until it comes off.

Second hand

If there is a second hand on the clock, it only needs to be grabbed with the thumb nails and pulled straight off of the clock to take it off.

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Quartz clock movement installation

This is a quick step by step practical guide for the quartz clock movement installation. The first step is to get the old unit out of the way. This is done by removing the hands from the clock and then the hex nut that is located under where the hands used to be. The movement will fall out the back of the clock dial. now it is out of the way and you can put in your new fine quartz clock movement you bought from clockworks.com. Quartz clock movement installation is very easy usually. These are the assembly instructions for the time only quartz clock movement into the clock case.

Sequential order of installation

  • 1. Place the steel hanger over the threaded post (optional)
  • 2. Place black rubber washer on the post next (optional)
  • 3. Start mounting the movement by putting the post through the dial
  • 4. Slide the brass washer onto the post of the movement that is sticking out of the clock dial
  • 5. Put hex nut on post and tighten to hold movement to the back of the clock face.
  • 6. Push hour hand on the post by friction fit
  • 7. Put the minute hand on the post
  • 8. If using a second hand install now by friction. The post just sticks into the end and use the doughnut.
  • 9. If not using a second hand just secure the minute hand with the pretty cap nut.

The movement is now installed

This applies to all battery operated clock movements available on clockworks.com. Such as chiming quartz, time only, with the only exception being the clock inserts.

- - The content of this web page and web site was written and copyright by James Stoudenmire of Clockworks.com - It may not be used commercially without permission. - -

Quartz clock movement measuring

When the quartz clock movement is ordered it will ask for the post length. A hex nut will be on this threaded post that is to be measured. A hex nut is a 6 sided nut that secures the movement to the back of the clock dial. A clock dial is the thing with the numbers on it also called a clock face. The dial may or may not have a wood backing to it. With a wood backing the dial or face would be thicker and need a longer post. Clockworks.com offers multiple post lengths on the quartz movements for this reason. The post has to be long enough to go through whatever thickness we are calling the dial.

How to measure quartz clock movement post

What to measure

When replacing a quartz clock movement you will need to measure the post on the old unit. This is so you can match it up with your new quartz movement. The post is the part that goes through the dial (face) and mounts from the front. This applies all clockworks.com quartz movements including chiming quartz, time only quartz.

- - The content of this web page and web site was written and copyright by James Stoudenmire of Clockworks.com - It may not be used commercially without permission. - -

Measuring quartz post lengths

To replace a quartz clock movements we need to do some measuring to get the post length. The post has to stick out through the front of the clock dial. It has to stick out on the front side enough to put on the hex nut on. The movement would then be secured to the back of the dial (clock face) so it will stay and not move. So the movement will turn and the hands will point to the right place where it was set.

Use the chart if building a clock

The below chart will tell us what size post is required to be able to go through the thickness of the clock dial. Again, all that is needed is the post to be longer than the thickness of the clock dial. A clock dial is the face or you can say the thing with the numbers on it.

Measure if replacing a clock

If replacing a movement and not building clocks it maybe easier to just measure the old post instead. Remove the quartz clock movement first by removing the hands and then the hex nut. Next measure the threaded post that the hex nut was on only. Only measure the fat part of the hand shaft that we call a post, this is the part that takes the hex nut only. This is the part that secures the movement to the dial and is all that needs to be measured. The old unit fit before its the correct post length you will need for your brand new quartz clock movement. This applies to all quartz clock movements available on clockworks.com. Such as chiming quartz and time only quartz.

Dial Thickness

  • 1/16 inch thick
  • 3/16 inch thick
  • 5/16 inch thick
  • 9/16 inch thick
  • 3/4 inch thick

Size Post Needed

  • 3/16"
  • 5/16"
  • 7/16"
  • 11/16"
  • 15/16"
How to measure quartz clock movement post

- - The content of this web page and web site was written and copyright by James Stoudenmire of Clockworks.com - It may not be used commercially without permission. - -

Quartz clock movement glossary

The quartz clock movement glossary below are the terms typically used when replacing a unit. This will help us understand the instructions for building or replacing quartz clock movements.

Clock Dial Dial =

The clock dial is the thing with the numbers on it that you tell the time with. Sometimes called the clock face and can come in any size or shape as long as there is indicators as to what the time is.

Quartz clock dial Post =

Threaded portion on the movement that takes the hex nut. This is the fat part of the quartz clock movements hands shaft, and this part sticks through the back of the dial to the front to get mounted with a hex nut.

Quartz clock mounting hex nut Hex Nut =

A six sided nut that threads onto the movement post. This secures the movement to the back of the dial so it will stay there. The movements post sticks out just enough to get this hex nut on and so everything is secure and ready for the clock hands.

Quartz clock movement hanger Hanger =

A hanger is the steel part to hang clock up on the wall and comes with the time only series quartz clock movements. The hanger is included with the quartz clock movement, but optional to use.

Quartz clock hands Hands =

Quartz clock hands are measured by the minute hand only. They come as a set when ordered, the hour hand is smaller and shorter of course but we only measure the length of the minute hand from the center of the mount to the end. This applies to quartz clock movement hands only. (battery run)

Quartz clock movement second hand Second Hand =

The second hand is the skinny hand that goes very fast on the clock. There are two types of second hand motions, one will sweep around in a continuous fashion. These types of quartz clock movements are called a continuous sweep. If the movement jumps from one second to the next we call it a step motion instead. The second hands are mounted with a tube that is on the hand itself. This tube sticks friction fit into the end of the quartz clock movements hand shaft.

- - The content of this web page and web site was written and copyright by James Stoudenmire of Clockworks.com - It may not be used commercially without permission. - -

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