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Mechanical Wall Clock Kit WMKIT04

This is a quality 8 day, German made, gong strike, spring driven unit. It has the popular 131-041 25cm Hermle clock movement with the hammer on the back that strikes a gong (included).

Here are some measurements you need to know to build your case, but of course the best thing to do is to get the movement first and then build the case afterward. The hand shaft, (shaft that the hands go on) is 27.2mm from the front plate and all the way out. The pendulum length on this unit is measured from the top of the clock movements suspension post and all the way down. This measurement is 25cm and includes the pendulum tip to tip, the leader it hangs on, and the suspension that the leader hangs on.

The kit comes with the movement, gong with mount, the pendulum, hands and a key. This is a complete clock with out the wood case.

This is a nice compact quality made round unit that runs for 8 days on a wind. Mounting the movement is usually done in the front with the front movement mounts (included).

The special pricing on this kit is only due to the fact that we happen to have overstock on them. As you can see the price is below even the price of a movement alone, and you get everything mentioned.

Mounting Instructions

Thank you for purchasing this clock kit! This is a quality German made Hermle 8 day key wind movement that will withstand the www of time. Here are some simple instructions to get you on your way.

1. Mount the Gong
After you build your clock case you will need to mount the gong in the case first before the movement. The movements strike hammer is on the back of the movement, it is adjustable with the wire that the hammer head is on. The gong gets mounted in the back area of the movement and then the movements hammer gets final adjusted by bending the hammers wire. The hammers destination is in the center of the round gong, on the flat portion, this is where it is supposed to make contact. The hammer should be in this area and be about 1/8 inch above this gong wire when its at rest. The space between the hammer and the gong wire is so the hammer will make a crisp gong tune without double hitting, thudding, or missing the gong completely.

The gong comes with a base. This base gets secured to either the back of the clock case or to a gong mounting board that is created on the customers end. However way it is done, this is a rear hammer movement so the gong base needs to be in the area of the back of the movement. After the base is installed you can put the gong wire on its base but using the screw that is pre screwed into the base center. Take the screw off the base, put the gong wire on it, then screw it back together. Before you tighten it up too much you need to position the gong wire to its approximate position and then tighten it. I say approximate position because as previously mentioned, the hammer wire on the movement is what will be the final adjustment.

1. Adjust the bell hammers
The mounted two bell strike system will need some final adjusting before mounting the movement. This is because during shipping the hammers may not be aligned for a crisp musical bell tone. The hammer heads need to be away from the bell at rest, about 1/8 inch away. This is adjusted with your fingers just bend the hammer head wire up / down / side / side to get the hammer heads into position at that 1/8 inch away measurement. This will produce a nice bell sound with out thudding, double hitting, or missing the bells completely.

2. Mount the Movement
The Hermle 131 movement series is pretty diversified with its mounting capabilities as it can be mounted in the front or the back depending on your needs. It is best to come up with a mount that allows the back of the movement to be accessed without too much hassle, in case you need to change the suspension spring at some point or if the leader needs to be adjusted.

Front
For a front mounting method you would use the enclosed dog ear looking brackets and put them on the front plates pillar posts, under the hex nut that is holding the front on. Of course you would want to do only one at a time so the movement does not come apart on you, just remove one hex nut, put the bracket on, and then put the hex nut back on. Then do the rest the same way, one at a time. Since this is a front mount you’re going with, the movement will get attached to the front of the clock case with a board between the front of the movement and the clock dial.

Back
This will either go into the back of the clock case or a wood mount that will support the movement but at the same time not get into the way of the pendulum assembly at all. If you choose to mount in a different fashion this is fine just take these long posts right off.

3. Mount the Dial
This movement kit does not include a clock dial, the dial needs to be picked out by the customer and drilled for this movements winding arbors on the customer end. The larger clocks are easy because customers usually want generally the same dial but with some minor differences. With these smaller units there are too many design possibilities to offer an array of pre-punched dials for this movement series. Please review our dial offerings as a separate purchase and or give us a call to discuss the options 800-381-7458

4. Install the Hands
After the dial is mounted it’s time to put the hands on the clock. First comes the hour hand that is installed only in a friction fit. You put the hour hand on and twist and push down toward the dial at the same time. The more down the hour hand is toward the dial, the tighter fit it is as the hour hand post is tapered. You want it on fairly snug but not touching the dial or the minute hand that comes next. The hour hand, the dial, the minute hand should all be parallel with each other and not hitting each other during any part of their rotations.

Hands for these modern German units are designed with a rotate-able center mount in the minute hand. You need to know this as when you set up the clock at first it will not strike exactly on the hour or quarters like it should. To correct this issue it is only needed to take the minute hand off and use needle nose pliers to spin the center mounting bushing independent of the hand itself. You hold the minute hand in one hand, the needle nose pliers in the other while grabbing and spinning this center hand bushing. What this does is align that square hole in the way you need it to mount so the hand is pointing to the correct time when it chimes.

5. Install the Pendulum
The pendulum assembly consists of three components and the Germans measure all of them in one measurement. The measurement is stamped on the back plate of the movement itself in CM. The three components are the suspension spring on the very top, the leader it hangs on, and then the pendulum length all the way down to the very bottom of the pendulum rating nut threads.

When you get the movement the suspension spring will be installed but not always the leader that hangs on it. This you would put on as follows: Take the set screw out of the suspension post as to release this suspension spring and then lower it with your fingers. When the spring is lowered you are able to hook on the leader hook top, and you at the same time need that leader engaged with the crutch that swings back and forth on the back of the movement. So in other words, you will have the leader in the center of the crutch that swings it, as you hook the top to the suspension. With the leader attached to the suspension you can then bring the two part assembly up and back home into its suspension post and put in the set screw again. Now the movement is ready for casing and to be aligned with the chime block as described above. After the movement is cased and ready to go, you just hang the pendulum onto the bottom of the leader and put it in beat.

Please note !
Every pendulum clock needs to be put into beat to operate, if the clock is not put into beat it will run for 5 minutes to 12 hours and then stop every time. In many cases the complaint with a mechanical clock is that it stopped working after it was moved. This is usually from someone moving the clock without taking the pendulum off and this puts the clock out of beat. Out of beat is a term used in clock repair that basically means the clock is going tock-tick tock-tick instead of tick- tock- tick -tock. It is sometimes corrected by putting a matchbook or small piece of wood under one side of the clock case to make the tick and the tock evenly spaced. This can temporarily correct the problem and the clock runs fine. This method however is not as good as correcting the beat and having the clock run when it is truly straight and level.

You would adjust the beat by pushing the top of the pendulum left or right as it hangs in its clock case, just hold a lower portion of the pendulum with your left hand as you push the top of the pendulum left or right with your right hand. You will feel the freedom in the pendulum to move left or right, with some resistance at the sides at the end of your left or right travel. You are changing the beat of the clock when you go beyond this resistance and therefore changing the place of the freedom area. Don’t be afraid to move this pendulum top as there is nothing to break as you go left or right.

The pendulum is responsible for all the timekeeping of the movement. There is a rating nut on the bottom of the pendulum, this gets turned to get the time perfect. Timing a clock takes some time and patience to get perfect as you have to adjust it a few times to get it right. When turning this nut you are either raising or lowing the pendulums round bob at the bottom, and this positioning is what speeds or slows time. If you turn the nut to the right as to raise the bob, time will go faster, the opposite way to slow it down. The pendulum assembly consists of three components and the Germans measure all of them in one measurement. The measurement is stamped on the back plate of the movement itself in CM. The three components are the suspension spring on the very top, the leader it hangs on, and then the pendulum length all the way down to the very bottom of the pendulum rating nut threads.

GrandMother Clock Kit GMKIT102

Chain Driven, Westminster Clock Kit

This quality grandmother clock kit has a Westminster chime movement that it progressively at the quarter hours. Then it will strike out the hourly count when its done with the chime. It includes a phase of the moon dial, and a chime silence switch.

This is a nice clock kit size that will work best with a smaller Grandmother style case. The clock case would need to be able to except the movements minimum space requirements as indicated on the picture.

The Pendulum Length Options

The length of the pendulum comes in a few options. The Germans measure the pendulum length from the top of the movement and all the way down to the bottom of the pendulums rating nut threads. So this measurement is the pendulum itself from tip to tip off of the clock, the leader it hangs on, and the suspension that the leader hangs on. All three components in centimeters make up that CM length in the drop down menu.

If you want to know how long the actual pendulum is, subtract 15CM from the options with the pendulum length. This will exclude the leader and suspension, and be the actual pendulum length from tip to tip off of the clock. This length can vary as if a larger pendulum bob is selected, the actual length of the pendulum gets longer. Why the CM length matters at all is because if the pendulum length is not near the CM length of the movement, the clock will not keep time. So the gearing in the movement and the pendulum length works together to keep time around the specified CM length.

The bob width Options

The 'Bob' is the round disc at the bottom of the pendulum, it can be a variety of widths. To select the width of the bob, you need to first measure how wide the waist of the clock is. The bob size selected should have at least two inches on each side to swing back and forth.

Components are installed in this order

1. Chimeblock

Chimeblock Description

The chimeblock will mount to the back of the clock case by the included hardware. It has 8 premounted, pretuned chime rods and an overall length of about 27 inches through the block.

Chimeblock Installation

The back of the clock case will only need the four holes drilled to mount this. The bolts have a flat head screw driver slot on the ends, they go through the washer and install from the back of the case to the inside. The washers keep the bolts from going through the wood back and they thread right into the chimeblock. Sometimes it is good to have a spacer block mounted on the inside of the clock case where the chimeblock will mount. Keep in mind that the chime blocks positioning only has to be approximate as the movements hammers are meant to be bent into final position. What this means is it does not have to be dead on, just pretty close to where the movements hammers will be. It should be positioned so the tops of the hammer heads are about 1/2 or 1 inch down from the block that the chimerods come out of. The final adjustment will come later when you bend the hammer wires as to make the head about 1/8 away from the chime rod. This spacing between the head and the rod is so it will not thud or double hit. If you just do each hammer so it sounds good down the line, you will have a nice song at the end.  

2. Movement

Movement Description

The chain driven Westminster movement will run 8 days on a single wind up. It comes factory oiled and ready for installation. It includes its chains, mounting screws and washers, the leader, the suspension spring, hand nut and moon dial gear. It has two square shaped outer plates made of brass with the puzzle of gearing between them, and then it has the hammers on the back, 4 on one side for the chime and 4 on the other for the strike.

Movement Installation

The movement will need a seat board to mount on. A seat board can consist of only two parallel board strips that are approximately 2 x 2 square. These two boards run along the bottom of the hood of the case, spaced about 1 inch apart. The front plate of the movement sits on one board while the back plate sits on the other. The chains drop down between the boards to suspend the movement in the air where everything else will dangle from it. The movement is secured from underneath with the included two screws and rectangle washers. The washers are rectangle as it will clamp each seat board while the screw goes up to the movements bottom pillar post's threaded hole.

 

3. Moon Dial

Dial Description

Includes a smaller sized 9 7/8 x 13 dial can be used in a grandmother sized case(Typical size for grandfather clocks is 11 x 15 1/2 inch). The silver and brass tone dial has raised numerals. It has a moving moon phase function that works with the included moon drive gear.

Dial Installation 1. The Moon Gear.

The first thing is to mount the moon gear to the movement. It will be a single loose gear with a big hole in the center, included with your shipment. Note this gear has a small set screw on the side of it, sometimes two of them. This gear will go over the post that the clocks hour hand will go, and then tightened via the set screw. It may take a couple of tries to get the height correct on this post. What it has to do is mesh with the gearing on the back of the clock dial only.

2. The Selector Switch.

Next find the small steel arm that is about 1 1/2 inches in length with a set screw. This will go on the arm coming out of the clock movements right hand side. That is to say, your right as you face the front of the clock movement there is an arm sticking out the movement. The selector arm gets put on by sliding over that larger arm and secured with the set screw. It may or may not already be mounted on the movement, but if it is not, it only needs to be able to come through the slot at 3 o'clock. This will enable the customer to change the chime to silent.

3. The Moon Dial.

Mounting the dial is easy as it has four posts on the back that lock into the movement. Do not touch the dial with your bare hands as you can discolor it. It is best to use gloves or a rag to handle it. Line up the clocks hand shaft to the hole in the center of the dial and then line up the posts with the holes in the movement. At this point the dial is on the clock but it's not secured. There are two ways to secure the dial, one style has locking arms on the back of the front plate of the movement that slide over the end of the dial post to lock it tight. This is if both the dial and the movement are made this way. The other way this is done, there maybe holes in the ends of the dial post feet where an included tapered pin will go through the hole after it's on the movement. Sometimes the dial will be made with the holes in the end of the posts, and sometimes it will just get locked into the movement with the arms.

 

4. Hour and Minute Hands

Hands Description

Black Serpentine style hour and minute hands sized for the dial diameter.

Hand Installation

The hour hand has a round hole and is only a friction fit onto the post. It will be able to move forward or backward to adjust the time. The minute hand has a 2mm square hole in the rotatable mounting bushing. The minute hand is secured with the included minute hand nut. If the clock ends up chiming at other times than the quarters, do the following. Take the minute hand off of the clock, this is the longer of the two hands. With this minute hand off of the clock, turn it upside down, you will see it has a square hole where it attaches to the clock. Well this square hole is in a bushing that will rotate WITHIN the minute hand itself. So just use needle nose pliers to turn this bushing so the square in the bushing rotates. Then put the hand back on the clock and see if it is pointing to the correct place where it chimed. Then set to time.

 

5. Pendulum

Pendulum Description

The wood stick pendulum will come unstained so it can be stained like the case on the customers end. It is a simple design that is good for the rustic antique style look.

Pendulum Installation

The wood stick style pendulum will include the bob included separate in the packaging. The bob will need to be mounted to the bottom of the sticks rating nut threads, with the nut on the threads to secure it. This is called the rating assembly and it holds the pendulum bob on and is used to adjust the time keeping of the clock. If you turn the nut at the bottom as to raise the pendulum bob a little, this will speed up time. Reverse for slowing of time.

After the movement is in, its only a matter of hanging the pendulum on its leader. The term leader is that pendulum hanger on the back of the movement that swings back and forth. Be gentle with the pendulum and leader, no violent moves, just hang it on there and then stop the pendulum from wobbling around.

 

6. Weights

Weights Description

The kit includes three polished brass tone weights that are 47mm in diameter. The weights are shipped complete with fillers already assembled. Please note, these are tricky to ship as upon shifting back and forth sometimes the end caps get slightly damaged or concave. If this is the situation just let us know and we will ship out new end caps free of charge.

Weight Installation

Do not touch the weights with your bare hands as you can discolor them. It is best to use gloves or a rag to handle them. These weights may or may not all weigh the same, usually they do not. If they do not, the heaviest weight goes on your right as you face the clock. Out of the two that are left, if there is one lighter weight, this will go on your left as you face the clock. The reason for the inconsistency of the weight specifications is due to factors such as pendulum bob diameter and also the weights function. To hang the weights on is easy, there are three chains with the clock that loop over there sprockets in the movement. Just hang the weight on the side of the chain that has the hook on it, and then stop it from wobbling around.

Jauch PL93 Clock Movement Kit

Jauch PL93

(old unit marked PL93 or PL96)

  • Jauch clock movement conversion
  • Hands, shims, top hook, screws included
  • Chime weight filler also included

Every Jauch clock movement is discontinued as the company is out of business. What this means is you would be ordering a new movement made by Hermle instead.

The Hermle clock movements are of equivalent quality and size and have the same functions. These conversion kits are only good for the three weight Jauch floor clock movements. If your Jauch movement is anything other than this it will have to be repaired instead, please email us to set up a repair to [email protected] . If you do have the three weight Jauch movement then your on the correct path to get your clock running again with a brand new Hermle movement conversion kit as described.

The following modifications are usually required:
  • The dial must be attached to the case rather than the movement. There is a 50/50 chance really, sometimes the dial is attached to the case and sometimes it is attached to the movement with dial feet. If it's attached to the movement then you will need to unscrew or chop off the dial feet and attach it to the wood case instead.
  • The replacement for the Jauch clock movement would have to be shimmed higher (Included)
  • New lead weight would be installed into the existing right hand chime weight shell. (Included)
  • The top hook on the pendulum will have to get swapped (Included)
  • The pendulum may or may not have to get shortened. If the clock is too slow, even with the bob all the way up, the pendulum stick must get cut 1 1/2 inches shorter.
  • If you need assistance on replacing the Jauch clock movement you can call 800-381-7458
  • If this does not work out for you and you have the original packaging so it can be resold as new, you can return this kit for a refund.

The Hermle clock movement is a Westminster Chime unit with 8 hammers on the back.

This high quality German movement comes pre oiled and includes its chains, leader, suspension spring and hand nut.

Removal of this movement is easy and we provide instructions for the installation. This movement is in stock and can ship today. We are full time clock makers and retailers both, so if you need any assistance with install we can help.

Replacing a movement is less costly than a overhaul. These movements last 25 years before needing an over haul, but since its still being made at a fair price it is so much better just to replace. The clock will be problem free right away instead of months, last longer than a overhaul and its prelubricated.

Mechanical Wall Clock Kit WMKIT03

This is a quality 8 day, German made, Bim bam two bell strike, spring driven unit. It has the popular 131-070 18cm Hermle clock movement with the two hammers on the back that strike bells (included).

Here are some measurements you need to know to build your case, but of course the best thing to do is to get the movement first and then build the case afterward. The hand shaft, (shaft that the hands go on) is 33.2mm from the front plate and all the way out. The pendulum length on this unit is measured from the top of the clock movements suspension post and all the way down. This measurement is 18cm and includes the pendulum tip to tip, the leader it hangs on, and the suspension that the leader hangs on.

The kit comes with the movement, bells with mount, the pendulum, hands and a key. This is a complete clock with out the wood case or clock dial, you would use your old dial if you can or get a new dial and drill it out to wind the clock. The clock case would be typically a shelf style and this is to be built on the customers end.

This is a nice compact quality made round unit that runs for 8 days on a wind. The two included bells are nice as there is no chime block to work with, the movement comes with the bells already mounted and ready to go. Mounting the movement is usually done in the front with the front movement mounts (included).

The special pricing on this kit is only due to the fact that we happen to have overstock on them. As you can see the price is below even the price of a movement alone, and you get everything mentioned.

Thank you for purchasing this clock kit! This is a quality German made Hermle 8 day key wind movement that will withstand the www of time. Here are some simple instructions to get you on your way.

1. Adjust the bell hammers
The mounted two bell strike system will need some final adjusting before mounting the movement. This is because during shipping the hammers may not be aligned for a crisp musical bell tone. The hammer heads need to be away from the bell at rest, about 1/8 inch away. This is adjusted with your fingers just bend the hammer head wire up / down / side / side to get the hammer heads into position at that 1/8 inch away measurement. This will produce a nice bell sound with out thudding, double hitting, or missing the bells completely.

2. Mount the Movement
The Hermle 131 movement series is pretty diversified with its mounting capabilities as it can be mounted in the front or the back depending on your needs. It is best to come up with a mount that allows the back of the movement to be accessed without too much hassle, in case you need to change the suspension spring at some point or if the leader needs to be adjusted.

Front
For a front mounting method you would use the enclosed dog ear looking brackets and put them on the front plates pillar posts, under the hex nut that is holding the front on. Of course you would want to do only one at a time so the movement does not come apart on you, just remove one hex nut, put the bracket on, and then put the hex nut back on. Then do the rest the same way, one at a time. Since this is a front mount you’re going with, the movement will get attached to the front of the clock case with a board between the front of the movement and the clock dial.

Back
This will either go into the back of the clock case or a wood mount that will support the movement but at the same time not get into the way of the pendulum assembly at all. If you choose to mount in a different fashion this is fine just take these long posts right off.

3. Mount the Dial
This movement kit does not include a clock dial, the dial needs to be picked out by the customer and drilled for this movements winding arbors on the customer end. The larger clocks are easy because customers usually want generally the same dial but with some minor differences. With these smaller units there are too many design possibilities to offer an array of pre-punched dials for this movement series. Please review our dial offerings as a separate purchase and or give us a call to discuss the options 800-381-7458

4. Install the Hands
After the dial is mounted it’s time to put the hands on the clock. First comes the hour hand that is installed only in a friction fit. You put the hour hand on and twist and push down toward the dial at the same time. The more down the hour hand is toward the dial, the tighter fit it is as the hour hand post is tapered. You want it on fairly snug but not touching the dial or the minute hand that comes next. The hour hand, the dial, the minute hand should all be parallel with each other and not hitting each other during any part of their rotations.

Hands for these modern German units are designed with a rotate-able center mount in the minute hand. You need to know this as when you set up the clock at first it will not strike exactly on the hour or quarters like it should. To correct this issue it is only needed to take the minute hand off and use needle nose pliers to spin the center mounting bushing independent of the hand itself. You hold the minute hand in one hand, the needle nose pliers in the other while grabbing and spinning this center hand bushing. What this does is align that square hole in the way you need it to mount so the hand is pointing to the correct time when it chimes.

5. Install the Pendulum
The pendulum assembly consists of three components and the Germans measure all of them in one measurement. The measurement is stamped on the back plate of the movement itself in CM. The three components are the suspension spring on the very top, the leader it hangs on, and then the pendulum length all the way down to the very bottom of the pendulum rating nut threads.

When you get the movement the suspension spring will be installed but not always the leader that hangs on it. This you would put on as follows: Take the set screw out of the suspension post as to release this suspension spring and then lower it with your fingers. When the spring is lowered you are able to hook on the leader hook top, and you at the same time need that leader engaged with the crutch that swings back and forth on the back of the movement. So in other words, you will have the leader in the center of the crutch that swings it, as you hook the top to the suspension. With the leader attached to the suspension you can then bring the two part assembly up and back home into its suspension post and put in the set screw again. Now the movement is ready for casing and to be aligned with the chime block as described above. After the movement is cased and ready to go, you just hang the pendulum onto the bottom of the leader and put it in beat.

Please note !
Every pendulum clock needs to be put into beat to operate, if the clock is not put into beat it will run for 5 minutes to 12 hours and then stop every time. In many cases the complaint with a mechanical clock is that it stopped working after it was moved. This is usually from someone moving the clock without taking the pendulum off and this puts the clock out of beat. Out of beat is a term used in clock repair that basically means the clock is going tock-tick tock-tick instead of tick- tock- tick -tock. It is sometimes corrected by putting a matchbook or small piece of wood under one side of the clock case to make the tick and the tock evenly spaced. This can temporarily correct the problem and the clock runs fine. This method however is not as good as correcting the beat and having the clock run when it is truly straight and level.

You would adjust the beat by pushing the top of the pendulum left or right as it hangs in its clock case, just hold a lower portion of the pendulum with your left hand as you push the top of the pendulum left or right with your right hand. You will feel the freedom in the pendulum to move left or right, with some resistance at the sides at the end of your left or right travel. You are changing the beat of the clock when you go beyond this resistance and therefore changing the place of the freedom area. Don’t be afraid to move this pendulum top as there is nothing to break as you go left or right.

The pendulum is responsible for all the timekeeping of the movement. There is a rating nut on the bottom of the pendulum, this gets turned to get the time perfect. Timing a clock takes some time and patience to get perfect as you have to adjust it a few times to get it right. When turning this nut you are either raising or lowing the pendulums round bob at the bottom, and this positioning is what speeds or slows time. If you turn the nut to the right as to raise the bob, time will go faster, the opposite way to slow it down. The pendulum assembly consists of three components and the Germans measure all of them in one measurement. The measurement is stamped on the back plate of the movement itself in CM. The three components are the suspension spring on the very top, the leader it hangs on, and then the pendulum length all the way down to the very bottom of the pendulum rating nut threads.

Mechanical Wall Clock Kit WMKIT02

This is a quality 8 day, German made, Gong strike, spring driven unit. It has the popular 141-041 Hermle clock movement with the one hammer on the back.

The kit comes with the movement, gong with mount, the dial, pendulum, hands and a key. This is a complete clock with out the wood case.

Mounting Instructions

Thank you for purchasing this clock kit! This is a quality German made Hermle 8 day key wind movement that will withstand the www of time. Here are some simple instructions to get you on your way.

1. Mount the Gong
After you build your clock case you will need to mount the gong in the case first before the movement. The movements strike hammer is on the back of the movement, it is adjustable with the wire that the hammer head is on. The gong gets mounted in the back area of the movement and then the movements hammer gets final adjusted by bending the hammers wire. The hammers destination is in the center of the round gong, on the flat portion, this is where it is supposed to make contact. The hammer should be in this area and be about 1/8 inch above this gong wire when its at rest. The space between the hammer and the gong wire is so the hammer will make a crisp gong tune without double hitting, thudding, or missing the gong completely.

The gong comes with a base. This base gets secured to either the back of the clock case or to a gong mounting board that is created on the customers end. However way it is done, this is a rear hammer movement so the gong base needs to be in the area of the back of the movement. After the base is installed you can put the gong wire on its base but using the screw that is pre screwed into the base center. Take the screw off the base, put the gong wire on it, then screw it back together. Before you tighten it up too much you need to position the gong wire to its approximate position and then tighten it. I say approximate position because as previously mentioned, the hammer wire on the movement is what will be the final adjustment.

2. Mount the Movement
The Hermle 141 movement series is pretty diversified with its mounting capabilities as it can be mounted in the front, back or even bottom. It is best to come up with a mount that allows the back of the movement to be accessed without too much hassle, in case you need to change the suspension spring at some point or if the leader needs to be adjusted.

Front
For a front mounting method you would use the enclosed dog ear looking brackets and put them on the front plates pillar posts, under the hex nut that is holding the front on. Of course you would want to do only one at a time so the movement does not come apart on you, just remove one hex nut, put the bracket on, and then put the hex nut back on. Then do the rest the same way, one at a time. Since this is a front mount you’re going with, the movement will get attached to the front of the clock case with a board between the front of the movement and the clock dial. If there is rear posts on the movement that stick way out, you can remove these if you need too. They just unscrew and the movement will still be together after you do this as the pillar posts are stamped into the back plate of the movement.

Back
For a back mounting method you would use the included four long posts on the back of the movement. This will either go into the back of the clock case or a wood mount that will support the movement but at the same time not get into the way of the pendulum assembly at all. If you choose to mount in a different fashion this is fine just take these long posts right off.

Bottom Mount
If mounting this movement series from the bottom you would need to create what is known as a seat board. This is only two parallel boards that are 1x1 inch approximately that are running side to side in the clock case with about ½ inch between the two. This allows the front and back plates of the movement to each sit on a board and then be able to mount the movement with the enclosed seat board screws. The screw gets put into the rectangle washer first, and then it goes up from the bottom between the two parallel boards and into the threaded hole in the movement bottom pillars.

3. Mount the Dial
The dial on this kit is a simple white round dial with gold trim and Arabic numerals. The dial is pre-drilled for the movements winding arbor configuration so you can wind the clock with the key. The dial can be attached to a thin board via drilling holes and putting some brass finishing nails to the board. The dials positioning should be as such to have the center hand shaft hole aligned with the hand shaft itself, as well as the winding posts with there dial holes also.

4. Install the Hands
After the dial is mounted it’s time to put the hands on the clock. First comes the hour hand that is installed only in a friction fit. You put the hour hand on and twist and push down toward the dial at the same time. The more down the hour hand is toward the dial, the tighter fit it is as the hour hand post is tapered. You want it on fairly snug but not touching the dial or the minute hand that comes next. The hour hand, the dial, the minute hand should all be parallel with each other and not hitting each other during any part of their rotations.

Hands for these modern German units are designed with a rotate-able center mount in the minute hand. You need to know this as when you set up the clock at first it will not strike exactly on the hour or quarters like it should. To correct this issue it is only needed to take the minute hand off and use needle nose pliers to spin the center mounting bushing independent of the hand itself. You hold the minute hand in one hand, the needle nose pliers in the other while grabbing and spinning this center hand bushing. What this does is align that square hole in the way you need it to mount so the hand is pointing to the correct time when it chimes.

5. Install the Pendulum
The pendulum assembly consists of three components and the Germans measure all of them in one measurement. The measurement is stamped on the back plate of the movement itself in CM. The three components are the suspension spring on the very top, the leader it hangs on, and then the pendulum length all the way down to the very bottom of the pendulum rating nut threads.

When you get the movement the suspension spring will be installed but not always the leader that hangs on it. This you would put on as follows: Take the set screw out of the suspension post as to release this suspension spring and then lower it with your fingers. When the spring is lowered you are able to hook on the leader hook top, and you at the same time need that leader engaged with the crutch that swings back and forth on the back of the movement. So in other words, you will have the leader in the center of the crutch that swings it, as you hook the top to the suspension. With the leader attached to the suspension you can then bring the two part assembly up and back home into its suspension post and put in the set screw again. Now the movement is ready for casing and to be aligned with the chime block as described above. After the movement is cased and ready to go, you just hang the pendulum onto the bottom of the leader and put it in beat.

Please note !
Every pendulum clock needs to be put into beat to operate, if the clock is not put into beat it will run for 5 minutes to 12 hours and then stop every time. In many cases the complaint with a mechanical clock is that it stopped working after it was moved. This is usually from someone moving the clock without taking the pendulum off and this puts the clock out of beat. Out of beat is a term used in clock repair that basically means the clock is going tock-tick tock-tick instead of tick- tock- tick -tock. It is sometimes corrected by putting a matchbook or small piece of wood under one side of the clock case to make the tick and the tock evenly spaced. This can temporarily correct the problem and the clock runs fine. This method however is not as good as correcting the beat and having the clock run when it is truly straight and level.

You would adjust the beat by pushing the top of the pendulum left or right as it hangs in its clock case, just hold a lower portion of the pendulum with your left hand as you push the top of the pendulum left or right with your right hand. You will feel the freedom in the pendulum to move left or right, with some resistance at the sides at the end of your left or right travel. You are changing the beat of the clock when you go beyond this resistance and therefore changing the place of the freedom area. Don’t be afraid to move this pendulum top as there is nothing to break as you go left or right.

The pendulum is responsible for all the timekeeping of the movement. There is a rating nut on the bottom of the pendulum, this gets turned to get the time perfect. Timing a clock takes some time and patience to get perfect as you have to adjust it a few times to get it right. When turning this nut you are either raising or lowing the pendulums round bob at the bottom, and this positioning is what speeds or slows time. If you turn the nut to the right as to raise the bob, time will go faster, the opposite way to slow it down. The pendulum assembly consists of three components and the Germans measure all of them in one measurement. The measurement is stamped on the back plate of the movement itself in CM. The three components are the suspension spring on the very top, the leader it hangs on, and then the pendulum length all the way down to the very bottom of the pendulum rating nut threads.

Jauch PL116 Clock Movement Kit

Jauch PL116

(old unit marked PL116)

  • Jauch clock movement conversion
  • Hands, shims, top hook, screws included
  • Chime weight filler also included

Every Jauch clock movement is discontinued as the company is out of business. What this means is you would be ordering a new movement made by Hermle instead.

The Hermle clock movements are of equivalent quality and size and have the same functions. These conversion kits are only good for the three weight Jauch floor clock movements. If your Jauch movement is anything other than this it will have to be repaired instead, please email us to set up a repair to [email protected] . If you do have the three weight Jauch movement then your on the correct path to get your clock running again with a brand new Hermle movement conversion kit as described.

The following modifications are usually required:
  • The dial must be attached to the case rather than the movement. There is a 50/50 chance really, sometimes the dial is attached to the case and sometimes it is attached to the movement with dial feet. If it's attached to the movement then you will need to unscrew or chop off the dial feet and attach it to the wood case instead.
  • The replacement for the Jauch clock movement would have to be shimmed higher (Included)
  • New lead weight would be installed into the existing right hand chime weight shell. (Included)
  • The top hook on the pendulum will have to get swapped (Included)
  • The pendulum may or may not have to get shortened. If the clock is too slow, even with the bob all the way up, the pendulum stick must get cut 1 1/2 inches shorter.
  • If you need assistance on replacing the Jauch clock movement you can call 800-381-7458

Jauch PL64 Clock Movement Kit

Jauch PL64

(old unit marked PL64 Westminster)

  • Jauch clock movement conversion
  • Hands, shims, top hook, screws included
  • Chime weight filler also included

Every Jauch clock movement is discontinued as the company is out of business. What this means is you would be ordering a new movement made by Hermle instead.

The Hermle clock movements are of equivalent quality and size and have the same functions. These conversion kits are only good for the three weight Jauch floor clock movements. If your Jauch movement is anything other than this it will have to be repaired instead, please email us to set up a repair to [email protected] . If you do have the three weight Jauch movement then your on the correct path to get your clock running again with a brand new Hermle movement conversion kit as described.

The following modifications are usually required:
  • The dial must be attached to the case rather than the movement. There is a 50/50 chance really, sometimes the dial is attached to the case and sometimes it is attached to the movement with dial feet. If it's attached to the movement then you will need to unscrew or chop off the dial feet and attach it to the wood case instead.
  • The replacement for the Jauch clock movement would have to be shimmed higher (Included)
  • New lead weight would be installed into the existing right hand chime weight shell. (Included)
  • The top hook on the pendulum will have to get swapped (Included)
  • The pendulum may or may not have to get shortened. If the clock is too slow, even with the bob all the way up, the pendulum stick must get cut 1 1/2 inches shorter.
  • If you need assistance on replacing the Jauch clock movement you can call 800-381-7458
  • If this does not work out for you and you have the original packaging so it can be resold as new, you can return this kit for a refund.

The Hermle clock movement is a Westminster Chime unit with 8 hammers on the back.

This high quality German movement comes pre oiled and includes its chains, leader, suspension spring and hand nut.

Removal of this movement is easy and we provide instructions for the installation. This movement is in stock and can ship today. We are full time clock makers and retailers both, so if you need any assistance with install we can help.

Replacing a movement is less costly than a overhaul. These movements last 25 years before needing an over haul, but since its still being made at a fair price it is so much better just to replace. The clock will be problem free right away instead of months, last longer than a overhaul and its prelubricated.

Tubular Bell Grandfather Clock Kit GFKIT4

The Hermle 9 Tube Kit is the best sounding floor clock available.

Plays 4/4 Westminster, Whittington, or St. Michaels chimes sound each quarter hour and strike the full hour. It has an automatic beat adjustment, over wind protection, removable cable drums, second hand sweep.

  • Weight drop after 8 days is 63'
  • Full Weight Drop: 58'
  • Automatic night shut off for when your sleeping.
  • Exact second beat and automatic beat adjustment
  • Easy to mount system
  • Polished brass weight shells and pendulum bob
  • Black serpentine hands for a 10' time track dial
  • 61 inches from top of movement to bottom of longest chime tube
  • Moon dial measures 15 5/8'H x 11'W
  • Full 2-year factory warranty.
Components are installed in this order

1. Movement

Movement Description
Plays 4/4 Westminster, Whittington, or St. Michaels chimes sound each quarter hour and strike the full hour. It has an automatic beat adjustment, over wind protection, removable cable drums, second hand sweep. It comes factory oiled and ready for installation. It includes its cables, pulleys, mounting screws and washers, the leader, the suspension spring, hand nut and moon dial gear. It has two rectangle shaped outer plates made of brass with the puzzle of gearing between them, and then it has the 9 hammers on the back for the tubular bells.

Movement Installation
The movement will need a seat board to mount on. A seat board can consist of only two parallel board strips that are approximately 2 x 2 square. These two boards run along the bottom of the hood of the case, spaced about 1 inch apart. The front plate of the movement sits on one board while the back plate sits on the other. The cables and pulleys drop down between the boards to suspend the movement in the air where everything else will dangle from it. The movement is secured from underneath with the included two screws and rectangle washers. The washers are rectangle as it will clamp each seat board while the screw goes up to the movements bottom pillar post's threaded hole.

2. Moon Dial

Dial Description
Includes a standard sized 11 x 15 1/2 dial that can be used in a grandfather sized case. The silver and brass tone dial has raised numerals. It has a moving moon phase function that works with the included moon drive gear.

Dial Installation
1. The Moon Gear.
The first thing is to mount the moon gear to the movement. It will be a single loose gear with a big hole in the center, included with your shipment. Note this gear has a small set screw on the side of it, sometimes two of them. This gear will go over the post that the clocks hour hand will go, and then tightened via the set screw. It may take a couple of tries to get the height correct on this post. What it has to do is mesh with the gearing on the back of the clock dial only.

2. The Selector Switch.
Next find the small steel arm that is about 1 1/2 inches in length with a set screw. This will go on the arm coming out of the clock movements right hand side. That is to say, your right as you face the front of the clock movement there is an arm sticking out the movement. The selector arm gets put on by sliding over that larger arm and secured with the set screw. It may or may not already be mounted on the movement, but if it is not, it only needs to be able to come through the slot at 3 o'clock. This will enable the customer to change the chime to silent.

3. The Moon Dial.
Mounting the dial is easy as it has four posts on the back that lock into the movement. Do not touch the dial with your bare hands as you can discolor it. It is best to use gloves or a rag to handle it. Line up the clocks hand shaft to the hole in the center of the dial and then line up the posts with the holes in the movement. At this point the dial is on the clock but it's not secured. There are two ways to secure the dial, one style has locking arms on the back of the front plate of the movement that slide over the end of the dial post to lock it tight. This is if both the dial and the movement are made this way. The other way this is done, there maybe holes in the ends of the dial post feet where an included tapered pin will go through the hole after it's on the movement. Sometimes the dial will be made with the holes in the end of the posts, and sometimes it will just get locked into the movement with the arms.

3. Hour and Minute Hands
Hands Description Black Serpentine style hour and minute hands sized for the dial diameter.

4. Pendulum
Pendulum Description
The brass tone Lyre pendulum is 44 inches (114cm movement) or 34 inches (94cm movement) from tip to tip off of the clock. This lyre pendulum comes with a polished bob. At the bottom of the pendulum is the rating assembly. This is only a nut and threads that hold the pendulum bob on. It is called the rating nut and threads as it is used to adjust the time keeping of the clock. If you turn the nut at the bottom as to raise the pendulum bob a little, this will speed up time. Reverse for slowing of time.

5. Weights
Weights Description
The kit includes three polished brass tone weights that are 60mm in diameter. The weights are shipped complete with fillers already assembled. Please note, these are tricky to ship as upon shifting back and forth sometimes the end caps get slightly damaged or concave. If this is the situation just let us know and we will ship out new end caps free of charge.

NEW 9-Tubular Bell Kieninger Clock Movement

Kieninger Clock MovementKieninger IdentificationOrdering the clock movementWhy get a new Kieninger?

Please view these information tabs to learn more about replacing a Kieninger Clock Movement.

Kieninger clock movement identification

The first step to replace the movement or any components is to first do the identification process on the Kieninger clock movement. To get the new clock movement price and what it includes, we start with the numbers. The numbers are also required to get components of the clock also. Components include pendulums, dials, hands, keys, cranks, chime blocks, mounting screws, weights, pulleys or chains.

Decoding Kieninger clock movements

For example lets say the movement numbers are 81 K 116cm.

  • 1981 =The first numbers 81 is the year made if it is an on older unit. On the new units this number is not the year but only an internal engineering code.
  • K = The K is the movements series. This is the basic raw movement plate size and internal gear configuration.
  • 116CM = The pendulum length in centimeters measured from the top of the movement all the down. Based on the smallest 4 1/2 inch bob diameter.

Kieninger Clock Movement Identification

Dating the Kieninger movement

Above is stated 81 was the date, however this has changed in the later years. After a certain date that first number is no longer the date produced. So it may or may not be the date, but you can just ignore that first number when replacing the unit. There is no longer a solid way to date the Kieninger clock movement unless it is stamped on the plate.

We can help

The new movement will fit into the clock case just as the old one did. Keep using the same components such as the dial, pendulum, chime block and weights. If it is a weight driven clock it will come with the chains or cables with pulleys. If this decoding process is confusing, just email the numbers or a picture to [email protected] Kieninger clock movement questions and ordering can be done by phone also 800-381-7458.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire

Kieninger Clock Movement Ordering

Kieninger Clock Movement Ordering starts with the numbers off of the back plate of the clockworks. The numbers help us figure out the correct unit by plate size. After we get the plate size we narrow it down by attributes such as triple chime. In other works all the units that have the letter K on the back will have the same plate size. After we determine we have a K series we select things like triple chime or Westminster only. If there is any uncommon things added after that we select it. Such as sequential or carousal or other special qualities added such as this.

Steps to a new Kieninger clock movement

First go to the letter that is stamped on the movement only. If for example the movement number is 81 K 116cm ignore all but the K at first. Find the K series on the Kieninger movement page at Clockworks.com. Then we can continue with matching up the CM in the drop down list.

Attribute selection

On that same drop down list with the CM listed there are some other options usually. The options to select are the specific quality's the movement may or may not have on the movement. Such things as Westminster only or triple chime. If there is dancers on the movement it may say carousel. Just pick the what ever movement you have that matches the options.

After ordering the Kieninger movement

After ordering the new Kieninger clock movement a receipt will be emailed. The installation instructions will be provided via a link on the receipt. Weight driven units ships with the chains or cables with pulleys included. The new movement will ship the next business day by Fed Ex ground.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire

New Clock Movement Benefits

New clock movement benefits far outweigh the benefits of an overhaul. This section will explain why that is and what the best course of action is to get your clock working.

Getting the movement worked on

Clocks need to be oiled after 10 years or so. Then, after 20 or 30 years, a full break down of the movement is necessary. This is all well and good and can be done with the old movement. The movement will run for another 5 or 15 years with no issues but then it will be time to do it again.

Every time the movement is worked on and re-bushed, it will last less and less time before it needs attention again. The repair process is expensive because it takes time to separate the plates, remove all the gears, do the necessary work, and then put them all back together again. This process may need to be redone if not perfect the first time. The turn around time to complete an overhaul could be anywhere from 1 to 3 months, and in some extreme cases, a year. It is a slow moving venture that costs twice as much as a new movement would. If a new movement is not available, then this is the best, and only, way to handle a clock repair.

Replacing with a new clock movement

If the movement is still in production, it is far better to just get the new one. Mass production makes the movement so affordable it will cost a fraction of the price of the repair work. The movement will be the same one but brand new and ready to run 30 years without much complaint. There is absolutely no way to repair an old movement so that it is better than new. Even the best clockmaker using the best equipment cannot make the movement better than a new one.

A new one is a factory fresh restart. The clock will be like it was originally when it was purchased from the store. The new movement will be made by the same people, with the same machines, and the movement is the same. It is not a close replica or made somewhere else besides Germany. It is the same movement. Not a knock off or replica. So wouldn't it make sense to get the new one instead of chasing the old? The choice is clear and obvious. The new movement will cost a fraction of the price and the clock is up and running in no time.

Movements to consider getting repaired instead

If a unit is no longer in production and not available new, then a repair is most likely your only option. However we will try to convert it to a new unit that is close and easy to adapt. If it is not an easy one to adapt, or would take too much case work, then the best solution is to get it worked on.

Another movement to consider getting overhauled instead of replaced is the tubular bell, which is a high end movement. The price of a tubular bell unit makes an overhaul more attractive. This is because of the high price on the new ones which is currently around $1600. Usually the price is less for the new unit but instead these units are more costly than the overhaul by clockworks.com anyway. We can charge only $900 for the complete overhaul on these units. Ultimately the choice is yours. There is a good argument in both directions that makes sense on these expensive units.

Clockworks.com = The best repair service

We would love to do the overhaul here at clockworks.com and we do the best job. There are two ways to fix clocks; the easy way and the hard way. We only do it the hard way with no short cuts. It is even more important for us to do your repair than another company because we do not go to your house. There is no one being intrusive in your home and possibly damaging your clock case.

The movement itself is the only item that gets sent to us. No components need to be sent since we have everything else here such as weights, dials and pendulums. It is a great advantage to have clockworks.com work on your movement for this fact alone. A clock supply depot such as us does not need to wait for parts. We possess everything we could possibly need to complete a thorough, professional clock repair right here.

The new movement

New clock movement benefits usually do indeed outweigh the repair option. The movement will already come lubricated with clock oil so there is no need to oil it. The clock comes with cables and pulleys, or chains, the leader, and suspension spring. This is everything that comes out when you remove the two screws that are under the movement, besides the dial and weights.

Once you get the hands and the clock dial out of the way (instructions included) it's only a matter of removing the two screws from underneath. The new movement can be swapped out by an experienced person in 10 or 15 minutes. An inexperienced person will take longer, but the point is that it isn't hard to do. There are some instances where a clock case was made in an annoying way that makes it more difficult, but for mass produced clocks this is not the situation. This more related to a few individual clockmakers who may have designed the case to make it more tricky to get the movement in or out.

Summary

A new clock movement is typically less than half the cost of an overhaul. It will also be on its way to the customer instantly instead of months later. A new clock movement will last the longest of any other choice.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire

9-Tubular Bell Kieninger Clock Movement

9-Tubular Bell Kieninger Clock Movement is known as the HTU. This is the only 9 tube that Kieninger has created, so there will be no confusion on getting the right one.

9-Tubular Bell Kieninger Clock Movement comes with

This high quality German Kieninger movement comes oiled and includes its cables, pulleys, leader, suspension spring and hand nut.

Despite its huge size this movement is easy to install. 9-Tubular Bell Kieninger Clock Movement comes already mounted on a seat board and the tube rack is already installed. The movement will have removal and installation instructions and our support.

Kieninger removal and installation

Removal of this movement is easy and we provide instructions for the installation. This Movement is in stock and can ship today. We are full time clock makers and retailers both, so if you need any assistance with install we can help.

Why a new 9-Tubular Bell

These 9-Tubular Bell Kieninger Clock Movements last 25-35 years before needing an over haul, but since its still being made at a fair price it is so much better just to replace. The clock will be problem free right away instead of months, last longer than a overhaul and comes oiled.

Conclusion

An overhaul of this unit usually takes a month or more to complete. However the new movement is available to ship today. The best overhaul by the best clock maker cannot make an old unit better than new. That would be impossible. It is not required to hire anyone to put this in the clock case usually. The owner of the clock can install this 9-Tubular Bell Clock Movement with out a professional. If a person can change a car tire or even a spark plug this will be no issue.