Grandfather Clock Strike Quantity Correction

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Grandfather Clock Strike Quantity Correction

This article is to solve the issue of the German clock not striking out the correct number of hours. This includes if it is striking any hour for two hours in a row, or even if it is striking more than 12 hours at a time, or even striking forever. The correction does not require the removal of the clock movement, only the removal of the dial. So the movement can sit up in the cabinet like it always is, but the hands and dial need to be off the clock.

Where the issue is

The best way to learn the simple action of the strike count, is to watch the components on the front of the movement when its striking. Just keep the dial off the clock, make it strike by advancing the minute hand, and watch the parts in the front of the movement in action. Grandfather clocks use a rack and snail counting system for the proper number of strike to be heard on the hour. The rack is the saw like thing that drops down onto the snail looking thing that is part of the hour hand tube. If the rack is not connecting to the snail in a proper way, the strike will not strike the proper amount of times. The correction is in the hour hand tube itself, that is the tube that the hour hand mounts to. This tube is one or two teeth off from where it is should be and is an easy fix. Grandfather Clock Strike Quantity Correction

Strike quantity correction

If the clock is striking the wrong number of hours some hours and not all, the snail (hour tube) must be turned slightly so the rack will fall on the snail's humps correctly. The C clip comes off the gear it meshes with, so the hour tube can come up some and over the teeth of the other gear. The goal is to have the snail fall in the center of the hump instead of off to the side of it. If the clock strikes 12 and 1 o'clock ok, then the rest will be fine.Grandfather Clock Strike Quantity Correction

Strikes forever or not at all

If the rack is getting stuck on anything or if it falls behind the hour tubes "snail", then the clock will strike the same amount of times every time, forever or some number beyond 12 times. It can fall behind the snail by changing hands, since the hour tube has the snail on it, it moves forward upon removing the hour hand. This can cause the rack to fall behind the snail and therefore does no good for counting strikes like it should. The fix is to lift this rack with your finger and push the hour hand tube back so the rack falls on it.
The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2020

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W

My spring driven German wall clock stops although the pendulum swings and produces the normal sounding tick tock. In less than 15 minutes or so the clock will just stop. At his point manually advancing the minute hand results in some resistance that can only be overcome by moving the hand a little backwards. The hands do not have any mechanical touching or other interferences. The escapement advances normally. The rocker part of the escapement seems to float rather than maintain an adjustable position. The clock is level.

Are these common issues? What do you recommend?.

Bob Bankes
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Bob Bankes

on the flat part of the snail the edge flares out (why?) this is where the rack falls behind the snail. should it fall on the top of the flared out edge?

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