Mechanical clock suspension spring
Mechanical clock suspension spring
Mechanical clock suspension spring

Mechanical Clock Suspension Spring

(119 reviews)

$12.00$30.00

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Mechanical clock suspension spring

This is the most common suspension spring in use by far. Suspension A1 is for mantle clocks whereas A2 is for wall and grandmother units. The suspension A3 is for larger floor clocks such as a grandfather clock.

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Clock Pendulum Parts for the mechanical clock pendulum assembly are on this webpage, such as bobs and suspension springs.
Pendulum PartsDefinitionsMissing partsLength infoTimingSuspension infoSuspension InstallLeader infoTop Hook info
Please view these information tabs to learn more about replacing clock pendulum parts.

Clock pendulum components description

Altogether, this is a description of the clock pendulum parts and components. Please use this as a glossary for parts in a clock pendulum assembly.

Knowing the correct terms for the various pendulum parts is helpful when ordering replacements. We are quite adept at deciphering descriptions of parts however, knowing the name is always something we welcome.

The clock pendulum

First, a clock pendulum includes the bottom rating nut and threads, the pendulum bob, and top hook.

Additionally, these items are removable on wood stick pendulums only. Lyre metal clock pendulums do not have the ability to come apart.

Clock pendulum leader

Second, a leader is the part that the pendulum hangs onto when it is on the clock. It then in turn hooks to the suspension spring on the very top of the pendulum assembly.

Naturally, pendulum leaders vary depending on the manufacturer of the clock movement and they can also vary in length, as well as style. Sometimes there can be more than one type of leader for the same movement.

There are also instances where we custom make leaders for customers.

Suspension spring description

The clock pendulum suspension spring is the short spring steel part on the very top of the pendulum assembly. Its purpose is to suspend the leader and pendulum in the air. Generally speaking, its steel, spring like strips, flex to let the pendulum swing back and forth with ease and momentum.

Clock Pendulum Components Complete

In summary, the clock pendulum components include the pendulum hanging on the leader and the leader hanging on the suspension spring.

Put the complete pendulum assembly on the clock and it is ready to go. The next step is to put the clock in beat and run the clock to see how the time keeping is.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2022

Replacing Lost Pendulum Parts

By and large, replacing a lost pendulum part from its assembly is a process. It is more in depth than just matching up the broken pendulum part.

Certainly, narrowing it down requires a different method than just observation. The following text will guide you through that process.

The lost pendulum

First, identify the movement manufacturer. This is the beginning step to identify a lost clock pendulum. This is done by getting the movement numbers off of the back plate of the movement itself.

That is to say, it will not be in the manual that came with the clock. Moreover it will also not be on any stickers or the clock case.

Match the movement number here to find out who made the movement. Finally, proceed to the pendulum page. This is the first step in replacing a lost pendulum as well as replacing lost pendulum parts.

Hermle Clock Movement Availability

Lost pendulum leader

The leader hooks to the suspension spring. The suspension spring is at the top of the movement. The pendulum hangs onto the leader.

All, or some, of these parts are what you need to order to replace lost pendulum parts. Again, the order of the parts is the suspension spring, the leader, then the pendulum.

If the leader is missing, identify who made the movement. Use the above information to correctly identify the movement so it is possible to replace the pendulum part.

When you know who made the movement, it is easy to narrow down the possibility of what leader you need. This makes things much easier when replacing lost pendulum parts.

After knowing the manufacturer, match the information to a leader shown on this page.

In the final analysis, visually inspect the pendulum hook style, the crutch on the back of the movement, and the suspension hook.

Finally, compare the components of the clock to the options in that manufacturer category to figure out the best one. Replacing lost pendulum part can be tricky however with these descriptions the task should be less daunting.

The lost suspension spring

First know that style A is the very most common suspension spring style in existence. Check the top of the pendulum leader and if there is a double hook on the end it will be style A required for the clock.

Generally speaking, use style A3 for large grandfather units, A2 for grandmother and wall clocks, and A1 for mantle clocks. Suspension spring are one of the easier parts to ascertain when replacing lost pendulum parts.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2022

The mechanical clock pendulum length

A pendulum clock without a pendulum is a shame for sure. Hence, getting the mechanical clock pendulum length correct does take some diving into the clock world.

If there is no idea what pendulum it would take, this is a basic guide. Of course, this is a basic guide to narrow it down to the best pendulum for the clock. This will cover most situations, without special equipment to figure out the length.

The movement CM or PL stamp

On the back plate of the clock movement usually, there are some numbers and or letters for identification. Likewise, there may be an indication of how long the pendulum should be in the mix of these numbers.

It may say CM or PL and this stands for centimeter or pendulum length. Subsequently, this would be the length where it should keep approximate time. Generally, there are a few different ways to measure this depending on the country of origin.

Mechanical Clock Pendulum Length for German made movements

Most mechanical German made clock movements are easy to figure out the pendulum length. In essence, the numbers will let us know or the stamp will clearly state the CM or PL number. If it is German, keep in mind the CM length is not the actual pendulum length.

Altogether, German units measure this length from the top of the clock movement, and this includes the three components of the pendulum all in one length, in centimeters.

This length will include the pendulum itself, the leader that it hooks to, and the suspension spring on the top that the leader hooks on to, all in one CM measurement. To clarify, CM stands for centimeter and PL stands for pendulum length.

If no stamp try to convert

When there is no stamp with the CM on the movement, there are some additional steps that need to happen. You will need to cross reference The numbers on the back plate to the pendulum length that you need. The first step is to identify the manufacturer of the clock movement by using the movement numbers.

The movement numbers indicate who the actually manufacturer is of the movement. Various clock retailers may have a stamp of their name on it, but the numbers are always true to the manufacturer.

Converting numbers to CM length

Moreover, some movements do not have an indication of the pendulum length on the back plate. The unit will have a number that would need to be found on this website first to find out what the correct CM length is for it.

Conversion number example

Generally speaking, let's say that the movement has no CM stamp on the movement and only shows the Urgos number UW32319.

Go to the identification page to look at the movement number examples. In this example, we see that it is a Urgos. Now it is possible to go to the Urgos page and find the number to see what the pendulum length is.

In this example, the pendulum length would be 80cm, representing the full length with the size including the size of the bob.

German grandfather movements

Almost all grandfather clock movements are going to be German if made after 1950. The first thing we need to do is get the numbers off of the back plate of the movement. This is the only way, and we can't cheat by looking at the paperwork or clock case.

It has to come right off the back of the clockworks. The manual and the sticker on the case is of no use to get the pendulum.

American clocks

The American mechanical clock movement manufacturers refer to the pendulum length as a "drop". The drop is the length of the pendulum from the hand shaft all the way down to the bottom of the pendulum rating nut threads.

It is a different way of measuring the pendulum length then the German made way. The basis for both ways are on the smallest bob diameter. If the bob is larger or heavier, the length would be longer than what the stamp indicates.

No luck

If everything fails for one reason or another, the best chance for a pendulum is the wood stick style. This is the only style of pendulum that can be easily modified because it can be cut down.

These types of clocks are usually antiques, or of Asian origin, and information such as pendulum length is simply not available. Sometimes it takes a good guess on where the manufacturer meant to have the bob sit. To do it this way, you only need a pendulum with a stick that is way too long to begin with.

Chop it, try it, chop it, try it. Each time slowly cut an inch and half off of the sticks length and hang it back on. It will only take a couple of times, and if starting way too long it can always go shorter.

Clock makers method for Mechanical Clock Pendulum Lengths

There is another way, which is known as setting the beat rate. This is a more complex way and is usually just done by clock makers. It involves a beat detecting device that counts out the beats per hour, or the beats per minute. To do this, first figure out what the beat rate is suppose to be for that particular movement.

Then keep adjusting the pendulum length until it keeps time. There are cell phone apps out there these days that will tell the beat rate and the cell phone will listen and say if the clock will keep time with that pendulum. Go longer or shorter until the phone says the beat rate is set.

Contacting us for help with Mechanical Clock Pendulum Lengths

Please email the movement numbers from the back plate, and explain what part you need. The email address to send this information to is [email protected]. We always welcome pictures but they are not a necessity. If emailing pictures please include the back side of the clock movement where the markings are.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2022

Timing a mechanical pendulum clock

Timing a mechanical pendulum clock is all about the overall pendulum length. Rarely has anything to do with the movement itself, unless the movement not geared to the proper length from the start.

A mechanical clock is easy to time providing the correct pendulum. When the pendulum is correct for that particular movement it will hang on the leader and keep approximate time.

The fine timing can be done only with the pendulum adjustment located at the very bottom. At the bottom of the bob is some adjustment threads and a nut.

To turn the nut one way raises the bob and the other lowers it. A shorter pendulum will make the clock run faster. A longer pendulum makes the clock run slower.

Fine timing the clock

If the clock is timing slow, raise the pendulum bob by turning the nut at the bottom of the bob. If the clock is fast, do the same but lower the clock's pendulum bob instead. One full turn is somewhere around 1-2 minutes a day faster or slower.

If there is no more adjustment

If the bob is all the way up and its still too slow or fast, shorten either the pendulum or the leader it hangs on to correct.

A lyre pendulum that does not keep time with the bob all the way adjusted will need its length altered. It can be altered with the overall length by the pendulum itself or the leader it hangs onto.

The leader is about 5 to 7 inches long and engages with the crutch on back of the movement. The leader is the part that the pendulum top hook will mount to.

It is possible to shorten or lengthen the pendulum leader to put the clock in time range with some solder if needed. 1 3/4 inches is a good measurement to make one of these longer or shorter as needed, as this is the length of the threads at the bottom of the bob.

So it will give a full timing adjustment range all over again and can go up or down as needed.

German pendulum length CM stamp

The pendulum length is overall and not just the pendulum itself. These German units measure there pendulum lengths from the top of the movement and all the way down. This will include the suspension spring, the leader and also the pendulum itself.

This is based on a 4 1/2 inch bob diameter. Of course the larger the bob, the longer it will be beyond that CM stamp measurement.

Used to keep time, now does not

If the clock kept time in the past but now does not, it means a worn gear. The escape wheel is worn and it is advancing more than one tooth at a time.

The escape wheel alone would be hard to find, and hard to replace both. The entire movement would be disassembled to replace this worn escape wheel if there is another one found that will work.

The cost of having this done would be the same price as a new movement. There is no such thing as having a repair on a clock movement being better than a new movement.

The price would be about the same for a complete overhaul or a brand new one. First see if the clock movement is in production and available new. We do this by getting the numbers off of the back plate of the movement itself, right off of the brass. Please email and we will check the availability and quote for the new one.

If the movement is not in production anymore, then a movement restoration is the only option. You can ship the movement to Clockworks Attn Repair department for a beautiful restoration.

Mechanical Pendulum Clock Timing Issues - Conclusion

Fine timing of the clock is easy as seen. If the clock kept time in the past and now too fast, its time for a new movement and has nothing to do with the pendulum. A worn escape wheel is most likely the cause and a new unit would be less cost then a repair.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2022

Clock Pendulum Suspension-Spring Information

The following is a discussion on clock pendulum suspension-spring information. Naturally, suspension springs do not have to be exact in length. If the clock runs slow, simply raise the pendulum bob with the rating nut at the bottom.

Likewise, if the clock is running fast then turn the rating nut to lower the pendulum bob.

Most common springs

By and large, suspension spring A is the most common style suspension spring. Of course, it is most likely the one by default.

If the old suspension spring looks similar to this one then it is right. As a general rule of thumb, small mantle clocks take suspension A1, wall clocks and small grandmother units will take suspension A2.

The A3 size is for grandfather clock units with a larger pendulum bob diameter.

This size can also be seen on Grandmother clocks with larger bob diameters. Use the larger A3 with large bob diameters so the bob will not wobble front to back.

If using a pendulum with a bob of 8 1/2 inch diameter or larger please order Suspension A3 for this reason.

Not as common

Urgos uses the single hook style as seen in picture suspension B. However suspension A was the very most common to use.

Very old antique round movements mainly use Suspension C and Suspension D. These are mainly French clocks and US made units made prior to 1945.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2022
For information on how to install a suspension spring click here

Clock Pendulum Leaders

Mechanical pendulum clock leaders for post 1950 movements. These leader will fit clock movements made in Germany after WW2.

The first step to replace a lost leader is to visually match one to the old leader.

If the leader does not match up to any of the ones listed, please email us. A picture is always helpful. Look to see if the leader needs a double hook or a hole top in order for it to mount to the suspension spring. Similarly, check the other end and notice that configuration as well.

What is the required mount style for the pendulum to hang on the clock? In the middle section, what one will engage with the swinging crutch on the back of the movement? These are all important factors to consider when replacing the leader.

The length of the leader

If the leader is missing, however, there are some more steps to figure out what the leader length should be. Not all leaders have variable lengths and the ones that do are for Hermle and Kieninger clock movements only.

Kieninger is easy. Those leaders only come in two lengths. Grandfather clocks by Kieninger take the 7 inch leader. Wall and mantle units take the shorter leader.

Hermle leaders are much more in depth. Determining which leader is the correct length for a Hermle is a process. The next section will describe the ones available.

Hermle leader lengths

A Hermle floor or wall clock will always take leader D or G. leader E is for a low bridge to a high bridge conversion on a Hermle grandmother clock. Therefore, the elimination of this from the list of choices is viable if a conversion is not being done.

The next choice is leader F which is for mantle clocks. This one is also for creating custom pendulum lengths. Additionally, leader F and leader G are interchangeable.

So if you need leader G, a leader F can take its place with an alternate length. Please email us with any questions about Hermle leaders.

Hermle Clock Movement Availability

Leader F for Hermle mantle

Usually mantle clocks with a Hermle clock movement will take leader F. In a situation where the leader is missing and the length is unknown, the following steps need to be taken.

This will ensure that the correct leader length is chosen. First, use the CM number off of the back of the movement. This CM length is the pendulum length from the top of the movement all the way down to the bottom of the pendulum.

It is not the length of the pendulum itself. Often times this measurement can be confusing. It is important to measure this correctly. Failure to do so will result in the clock not keeping proper time.

Second step, is to take this CM length and divide it by 2.54 to get the inch equivalent. Then subtract the length of the pendulum and the suspension spring length from this measurement. The measurement that is left is the length you need for leader F.

There are 1 1/2 inches of thread at the bottom of the pendulum for fine adjustment. Because there is so much room for adjustment, this measurement does not have to be exact. If there wasn't any extra length then it would need to be more precise. However this is not the case so close is good enough.

If the leader is the wrong length

Determine the timing of a clock by the length of the pendulum and the weight of the pendulum bob. This can get a bit confusing for some people. There is a stamp of the overall pendulum length on the back plate of the clock movement with a CM number.

This CM stamp is the overall pendulum length from the top of the clock movement all the way down to the bottom of the rating nut. The basis for this is on the smallest bob diameter.

Subsequently, a wider pendulum bob will require a longer pendulum. Again, this can get a bit tricky. Please feel free to send an email with any questions. We will be glad to help.

Often enough a clock will either run too fast or too slow. If the pendulum is too long, the clock will run slow. On the other hand, if the pendulum is too short the clock will run too fast.

In addition, the wrong leader length will also create problems with accuracy. You may or may not be able to correct this by raising the bob up or down. This is done by turning the rating nut below the bob.

If all else fails, a different leader length may need to be bought. Before shortening a pendulum it would be best to contact us to see if this is the best option. Cutting the pendulum is the last resort.

In Conclusion

As seen, this is not a cut and dry procedure. There are many factors that play into getting the correct combination so the clock will keep correct time. The correct leader is just one part of the whole process.

Sometimes all it takes is a leader that is a bit longer or shorter to correct an issue. There are also times where we have custom made leaders for customers.

Measuring is also important. No matter what situation it is we can surely find a solution. Don't ever hesitate to reach out and ask a question. Pictures are always good to send so we can see what exists now. Email is always the fastest way to contact us.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2022

Clock Pendulum Top Hooks

Mechanical clock pendulum top hooks replace broken top hooks or to build a new pendulum. This is a nice alternative to replacing an entire clock pendulum if the top is broken or missing.

The top hook is the very top of the pendulum that will enable the pendulum to hang on the leader. To clarify, the leader is the 4 to 7 inch long bar that drives the clock pendulum back and forth.

What they fit

In fact, most of the top hooks here fit German post WW2 mechanical pendulum clocks. There are some top hooks that are for, or can only be useful on antique clocks.

It matters only that the pendulum can hang into the air onto the leader and be stable. Antique clock pendulums can use any one of these top hooks if it will do the job.

How to install

The top hook installation is by friction only. Bend the tabs over and use a punch and a hammer to secure it to the wood stick. Another way is to drill starter holes into the top hook and secure with screws or nails.

The content of this website is copyright by Clockworks and written by James Stoudenmire in year 2022

Mechanical clock suspension spring

This is the most common suspension spring for movements by far. Suspension A1 is for mantle clocks whereas A2 is for wall and grandmother units. The suspension A3 is for larger floor clocks such as a grandfather clock. It is known as a suspension because it suspends the pendulum in the air.

The second part of the name is spring because it flexes back and forth. It would be a good idea if you order a spare spring. One can be put on the bottom of the weight section of the clock for the next time the spring breaks. That way you will not need to search to find a new one.

Additional information

Weight0.1 lbs
Type

A1 = Mantle Clock 5/8 x 5/16, A2 = Wall / Floor Clock 13/16 x 5/16, A3 = Large Floor Clock 1in x 7/16, A4 = Large Floor Clock 1 1/4 x 11/16

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Ron
Ron
19 days ago

From all your answers I’ve seen here, the A3 is the spring for pretty much any make of grandfather clock?

JOE
JOE
23 days ago

I have a Howard Miller wall clock with a broken suspension spring. The dim. from the screw hole to the posts in the broken spring where the pendlum hangs was approx.half an inch, what size spring should I order?

Gregg
Gregg
29 days ago

I’m looking for a suspension spring for a L & JG Stickley Oak Grandfather Clock

Larry Mahoney
1 month ago

Have a Grandfather clock from Montgomery Ward with a German ErhardJauch movement that needs a pendulem suspension spring, any hope of finding (2)?

Shelley Gill
2 months ago

I went on vacation and came home to a broken grandfather clock. The spring looks like it is missing a part.The works were made in England in 1700’s. The pendulum fell to the bottom of the clock but there are parts or broken pieces of metal. CanI send you photos so you can advise me on what parts I need?

Kathy B Haddon
Kathy B Haddon
2 months ago

I have an old peerless mechanism that has two holes where the suspension spring goes. Is there a suspension spring with two holes?

Kathy
Kathy
2 months ago

I know but it’s almost as the suspension spring should have two holes! Is that possible or are the two holes in the post of the clock that holds the spring used for a wider spring and either hole can be used?

Linda H
Linda H
3 months ago

I just bought a new movement from Clockworks for my Hermle 451-053 low bridge 85 cm grandfather clock. I previously bought a new pendulum and a 5 1/2” bob. Everything is now installed but the clock runs for a very short time and stops. The hands are not touching the dial and pendulum is not obstructed. It was running before I changed the movement. I only bought the new movement because the chimes weren’t working. Now the chimes work but the clock doesn’t. What else can I try to get my clock running?

Charles Cleveland
Charles Cleveland
3 months ago
Rating :
     

My old grandfather clock chime hammer shaft needs a return spring. Apparently the original straight wire spring was broken off flush with the inside of the plate, leaving the mounting hole plugged. If I can’t drift the stub out, I may have to drill a new hole nearby. Does that sound like a reasonable approach?
So what are these springs called? My searches for `straight wire springs’ havent turned up anything. Thanks for your help.

Terry Bickel
Terry Bickel
3 months ago

Suspension Spring replacement – I have a wall clock it has stamped on it 79 Emil Schmeckenbecher 141-071 38cm/ 111.15 .
 Need recommendation on suspension spring replacement.

Ralph Lewkowicz
Ralph Lewkowicz
3 months ago

Suspension Spring replacement – I have a Grandfather’s clock with a Jalich Uhreen Fabrick emperior # 251709 movement. It has a 110cm plumb bob pendulum with wooden shaft. Need recommendation on suspension spring replacement.

Russ Kook
Russ Kook
4 months ago

What is the part number for Westminster chime Model number 4882 suspension spring

Sophie Fama
Sophie Fama
4 months ago

I need a suspension spring for a mantel. Made in Germany 6/56, serial #457594, no maker name. Can you help?

Eugene B Doerr
Eugene B Doerr
4 months ago

I need a suspension spring for a Jauch movement… numbers on the back of the movement are 771173 and 232126.. Thank you!

Joyce Mashburn
Joyce Mashburn
4 months ago

I need a suspension spring for a Seth Thomas grandfather clock. Homestead H8403. Where can I find this?

Diana Nault
Diana Nault
4 months ago

I have a Colonial Manufacturing Grandmother clock model 1745. I need a suspension spring. I had ordered one a while ago and just had time to install it. I a having a problem getting the Pendulum arm to stay on it. I am not sure if I have the correct one. I see the A2 and A3 look like mine, but the little pin that the arm needs to rest on seems too short. Any suggestions?

Julie Hexspoor
Julie Hexspoor
4 months ago

I am looking for a fly wheel (their part #26) and a suspension spring (#66) for a Craftline Grandfather Clock with UW32-1 movements. Do you have crossover or substitute numbers and / or these parts?

BONNIE J GOOD
BONNIE J GOOD
4 months ago

We’re searching for a suspension spring with measurements 25 mm x 8 mm. There are two springs versus one connecting the top and bottom part. Would you happen to have one or could direct us to where we could obtain one. We would like to get the exact part if possible.

Thomas Dean
4 months ago

I have a howard miller floor clock model 610-160, movement 354125e, it is made in germany with a number on the rear uw326700 8508and under that number is another 1419400. Am desperately searching for a new suspension spring.

Patrick Phoebus
Patrick Phoebus
4 months ago
Rating :
     

I neglected to mention earlier that the clock I need the new suspension spring for is an Emperor clock with a model 100 M movement. Thank you for your help.

Patrick Phoebus
Patrick Phoebus
4 months ago
Rating :
     

Hello. I recently ordered A2 suspension springs for my clock. The square top half of the spring is nearly identical to the old broken one. However, the bottom square that has the pin attached is slightly taller and I can’t get the suspension arm to slide over it and rest on the pin. I believe I need to order a different suspension spring.

Patrick Phoebus
Patrick Phoebus
4 months ago

Thank you for getting back with me so promptly. The slot on the leader is not long enough for the base of the spring to slide through once the pin is placed beneath the hook on the leader. I The base of the spring can’t pass through the leader as you move the pin up toward the top of the hook. Should I try to file down the slot in the leader?

Patrick Phoebus
Patrick Phoebus
4 months ago

I was unable to figure out how to add pics here, so I emailed 2 images to the clockworks.com email address. Thank you for your patience.

Patrick Phoebus
Patrick Phoebus
4 months ago

Can’t figure out how to add a pic here

Roger
Roger
4 months ago

I need a suspension spring and pendulum leader for a Hermle 451-053h with a 94cm pendulum. The movement was manufactured in 1982. What would you recommend that I order. Thank you

John Gates
John Gates
4 months ago

Hi, I have an antique pendulum wall clock I received from my Aunt. I for the life of me can’t see where to hang Pendulum? The clock face says Karl Swoboda in wein, no other numbers or letters. There is a post attached to back of case that looks promising but pendulum top hook does not fit? Any ideas? Maybe missing clock suspension spring?

John Gates
John Gates
4 months ago

I sent via your main email.

John Gates
John Gates
4 months ago

Yup, if I can figure out how to attach pictures.

joe wersching
joe wersching
5 months ago

I have a WHAID 351-020 stamped 76 mechanism. I need a suspension spring. Do you have it and what is the price??? Please either send me a price or call me. 501-226-5699. Also do you have a picture of the suspension spring so that I may compare it to the one I have.
Thank you,
Joe

Sm McChesney
Sm McChesney
5 months ago

I have a W Haid 351-020 brass brass clock Stamped 1979 with Nu(C)Jewells. The suspension spring is broken. What suspension spring do I need to order?

ARUN BAKSHI
ARUN BAKSHI
5 months ago

Hi, The Pendulum suspension spring broke on our old AMS W150 M with Pendulum 73 cm .

What size do I buy for replacing the above.

KIEF KHANLARIAN
KIEF KHANLARIAN
6 months ago

Hi, we inherited a Kieninger wall pendulum clock. The suspension spring is cracked on one side.
The only numbers on the movement are ’76’ in the center and 29cm on the bottom right.
We have no idea of the model # or year made.

the spring looks like an open square 8mm wide, 17mm long, with a 6mm pin sticking out on both sides.

What should we purchase to replace this item?
Thank you

ronald e myers
ronald e myers
6 months ago

looking for a spring around 7 inches long

Carol J Green
Carol J Green
6 months ago

Hello, I have a Urgos movement UW32/3. I am in need of a suspension spring. Do you have one which will work?

Thanks and Smile
Carol

ksghost
ksghost
7 months ago

I obtained an Ethan Allen 30/30 grandfather clock with a Ridgeway 1161-853 AS 114cm/60 movement. There is also ’84’ on the movement above the words “RIDGEWAY CLOCKS”. The suspension spring is missing. Do you that part available?

ksghost
ksghost
7 months ago

Part ordered …. thank you very much!

Herb Panzer
Herb Panzer
8 months ago

I have a smiths mantel clock which needs a new suspension spring. What size do I need?

rec3400
rec3400
9 months ago

I have a Howard Miller Grandfather clock that was built in 1981 Model 610232 Serial 298194 It has the “Hermle” Movement design and the code on the back is 451-050 I need the Pendulum Suspension Spring . It appears the suggested springs by Clockworks will not fit, Any suggestions?

Gary St.Onge
Gary St.Onge
9 months ago

I have a PEARL grandfather clock. The suspension spring is 3/8″ wide by 3/4″ long. I would like to purchase 3 of these. Please send me pricing along with any other costs and where to send funds. Do you accept PayPal or credit cards? Thanks, Gary

Angie Camlin
Angie Camlin
9 months ago

I have an Ethan Allen floor clock, model #3806 FM movement, the pendalium is about 6 1/2″ , do I need A2 or A3? where can I get this suspension spring?

Rebecca briggs
Rebecca briggs
10 months ago

I have a Dufa grandfather, made in 1910. My suspension spring measures 1 1/4 inch by 1/2 inch. Which one do I order?

Ed Irwin
Ed Irwin
10 months ago

I have a Hermle 1151-050 94 cm movement. Is the type A2 suspension spring the correct one to order?

Mark Strimple
Mark Strimple
10 months ago

Hello I have a Ethan Allen floor unit it’s a mode-08-3801 with a movement E and need a suspension spring I’m coming up with measurements of
7.9375 mm wide
17.4625 mm long
12.7mm pin to hole
I’m assuming it’s an A2?

Thank you in advance!
Mark S.

Leslie
Leslie
10 months ago

I have a Hermle 451-453 and need to replace the suspension spring. Any suggestions on which size?

Steven Krysko
Steven Krysko
10 months ago

Do you have a suspension spring for a Howard Miller Grandfather clock model # 510-199?

Charles Sciullo
Charles Sciullo
11 months ago
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I have a wall clock from CCC Triberg PL 37 cm Werk 3000. I am looking for a replacement pendulum. Leader has a double fork hook facing open towards the door. Let me know if you have something that will work. Thanks

Charlie Sciullo

Graham
Graham
11 months ago

Hello! Please advise me on the type of Suspension Spring replacement that I can buy from you for my Gustav Becker Wall Clock. Model number P48 Serial number 285.

JOHN p BOHLIG
JOHN p BOHLIG
11 months ago

Hi I need A SUSPENSION SPRING RIDGEWAY CLOCK (EH MOVEMENT PART # 21-6) DO YOU HAVE ANYTHING THAT WOULD WORK?

JOHN

helen galow
helen galow
11 months ago

would you please tell me what size suspension spring I need for a kieninger 74R 93cm,also the pendulum& bob… thanks so much

Daniel
Daniel
11 months ago

Hey there,

I have this grandfather clock that my wife inherited from her pawpaw. It’s a cheaper Ethan Allen clock, but I decided to tinker on it today. The main problem is that it looks like one of the chains came off. With some patience, I was able to get the chain on again, but in the process, it looks like I broke the suspension spring. I was just wonder what I should order as a replacement?

Cindy
Cindy
11 months ago

I have a Seth Thomas Grandfather clock. The suspension spring is broken. The clock is A403-010 manufactured in 1978. The pendulum is approximately 32″ long (not including top piece or bottom screw) and the bob is 5.5″. Do I need A2 or A3 ? Thank you so much!

Julie OConner
Julie OConner
1 year ago

I have this small grandfather clock that says From the Treasure Hose of Colonial Manufacturing Company, Zeeland, Michigan. It’s older than 1954 I think. The thing that hangs the pendulum is a tiny brass part that snapped. Is this a suspension spring? If so, I don’t know which one to purchase. Maybe .75” long and 11/16” wide? Any help would be greatly appreciated.

julieoconner018
julieoconner018
1 year ago

Thank You! Will do!

Craig
Craig
1 year ago

I have a Herschede Edinburgh Grandfather clock that will run for 3 to 5 min then stop. I didn’t see any damage to the suspension spring, but I’m pretty sure that is the problem. I’d the A3 what I need? Thanks

Mark Frost
1 year ago

I have a Reinhold S.wall clock, circa 1870s Someone gave me to tinker with and I believe the whole issue is this ‘spring” has a LITTLE crease in the metal and is making the pendulum swing wobbly and not straight in its travel left to right., as it ticked away day and night when the pendulum wasnt attached (of course it ran fast) Do you think I can use some flat tooth pliers and reduce thank crease enough? If not–do I use the #2’s??

Lee Weltmer
Lee Weltmer
1 year ago

I have a grandmother clock with a 1976 Franz Hermle movement (451-053) and the suspension spring is broken. The pendulum is about 25 inches long and the bob is about 4 3/4 inches in diameter. Do I need an A2 suspension spring?

James Byers
James Byers
1 year ago

I am having a problem with the hour chiming on a 1161-853 straight. it will only chime a single time on any set hour. don’t know what to do.

James Byers
James Byers
1 year ago

Hi again: The problem with my 1161-853 is that the strike hourly count will only strike 1 strike any time it hits any hour strike.

James Byers
James Byers
1 year ago

Hello again James: I will try this today. I had previously had the rack dropping onto the snail right onto the groove indent of the next hour. You are suggesting I move the snail a couple of teeth further onto the flat portion of the hour. This should allow the chimes to work properly. Yes.

Rick Emery
Rick Emery
1 year ago

I am looking for a suspension spring for a Howard Miller #150 Westminister chime model number 4874.clock. I have some numbers off the back of the works one is UW32/1 and the next is 2GG448. The clock was built in 1972 and is weight driven. The pendulum disc diameter is 4 1/2″ in diameter. if you don’t have one can you please give me the measurements so I can find the correct one elsewhere. Thanks for all the help.